04 March 2011

RMIT links to leading Chinese university

Collaborative research with Chinese academics is on the agenda with the signing of an agreement between RMIT University and Peking University.

Dr Bingxin Wang, School of Health Sciences, RMIT; Professor Rengang Wu, Peking University; Professor Gill Palmer, Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic and Vice-President, RMIT; Professor Wei Hong, Peking University; Professor Ken Greenwood, School of Health Sciences, RMIT; and Professor Peter Coloe, Pro Vice-Chancellor Science, Engineering and Health and Vice-President, RMIT

Dr Bingxin Wang, School of Health Sciences, RMIT; Professor Rengang Wu, Peking University; Professor Gill Palmer, Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic and Vice-President, RMIT; Professor Wei Hong, Peking University; Professor Ken Greenwood, School of Health Sciences, RMIT; and Professor Peter Coloe, Pro Vice-Chancellor Science, Engineering and Health and Vice-President, RMIT.


RMIT welcomed Professor Wei Hong and Professor Rengang Wu, who delivered a signed Memorandum of Understanding with RMIT on behalf of Peking University.

Peking University, established in 1898, is a major research university in Beijing, China, and a member of the C9 League, an association of nine top Chinese universities.

It is ranked number 37 in the Times Higher Education rankings 2010 and 47 in the QS World rankings of the same year.

Professor Ken Greenwood, from the School of Health Sciences, welcomed the agreement, which focuses on developing links around psychology.

“This is the first agreement of its sort between RMIT and a leading Chinese university,” he said.

“Psychology is a developing discipline in China, for which there are fewer international links than in other disciplines.

“The links will involve collaborative research and staff and student exchange, but also an exciting, jointly taught Masters in Applied Counselling (one year in China and one year in Australia).

“I believe this is unique and will allow Chinese students to become familiar with Western approaches in psychology and counselling in Australia while developing their skills in China.

“I think students and staff from both cultures will benefit from understanding the problems, and approaches to tackle them, in each others’ country.

“For example, I am currently supervising a PhD student using an approach to insomnia treatment known as mindfulness, which is originally a very Eastern approach.”.

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