Functional Materials and Microsystems – Projects

Flexible Electronics

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A flexible and transparent electronic device
NPG Asia Mater, 5 e62 (2013)

Our group harnesses its expertise in materials science and microfabrication to realise flexible electronic devices.

The devices we make are predominantly on silicone (PDMS) and polyimide substrates. We have developed a novel process for transfer of high-temperature-processed crystalline oxides to flexible, elastomeric substrates. This is a platform for high performance, multifunctional flexible electronic devices.

This research project has received seed funding from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University (2010).


Two-Dimensional Materials

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Depiction of varying properties of metal contacts to two-dimensional materials
Appl. Phys. Lett. 103 232105 (2013)

The project aims to explore key fundamental properties of atomically-thin layers of functional materials made of transition metal oxides and dichalcogenides.

The fundamental insights gained from this project will serve as the driver for the next generation nanotechnology-enabled electronics systems. Results obtained from this project include a novel technique to synthesise layered MoS2 materials and the highest measured carrier mobility for exfoliated MoO3 materials.

This research project is funded by the Australian Research Council (Discovery Project DP140100170, 2014-2016) and received equipment funding from the Australian Research Council (Linkage, Infrastructure, and Equipment LE140100104, 2014).


Memristor Micro- and Nano-Devices

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Current-voltage performance of a memristor micro-device 
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15 10376 (2013)

Memristors are considered the fourth, and until recently the missing, electronic circuit element.

They have unique properties by which they remember their previous electronic experiences, making them suitable for multi-state and artificial memories. This project will realise multi-state nanoscale memories based on a resistive memory technology termed memristors, utilising ultra-thin films of perovskite oxides with tailored deficiency concentrations.

This research project is funded by the Australian Research Council (Discovery Project DP130100062, 2013-2015) and received equipment funding from the Australian Research Council (Linkage, Infrastructure, and Equipment LE120100004, 2012).


Terahertz Metamaterials and Plasmonics

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Etched coaxial silicon microcavities to support terahertz localised surface plasmon resonances
Adv. Opt. Mater. 1 443 (2013)

The terahertz regime covers the 0.3-3.0×1012 Hz range, corresponding to 100 μm to 1 mm wavelengths.

Subwavelength structures for terahertz (e.g., λ/10) fall within the regime of micro-fabricated devices. Utilising the ability to micro-fabricate to realise terahertz devices, we have realized terahertz devices for metamaterials – with the first examples of elastomeric, flexible metamaterials and planar metamaterials for sub-diffraction thin film sensing – and the generation of surface plasmons. We have also demonstrated mechanically tunable metamaterials with high sensitivity and polarisation dependent performance.

This research project has been supported by Victoria and AFAS-Vic Fellowships.


Dynamic Plasmonic Devices

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Micro-device for electric field induced surface enhanced Raman scattering
J. Am. Chem. Soc134 4646 (2012)

The use of functional oxides with specific focus on three properties--electro-optic effect, piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity--allow fundamental scientific investigations into plasmonic effects.

Moreover, the multidisciplinary combination of fundamental physical concepts and electronic materials/devices will enable innovative experimental approaches. Unexplored research areas envisioned are the use of controlled ferroelectric domain thin films for second harmonic generation and the use of active tuning of metallic nanoparticles for plasmonic devices.

This research project is funded by the Australian Research Council (Discovery Project DP110100262, 2011-2014) and has received equipment funding also from the Australian Research Council (Linkage, Infrastructure, and Equipment LE100100215, 2010).


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