Short courses are the future of training

Short courses are the future of training

Google has commissioned a new report into the future of work in Australia that found Australians will spend an additional three hours per week in education and training. The majority of this training will occur at work through short, flexible courses.

As advancements in technologies continue, Australians will need new skills to adjust to the future of work, according to a new report commissioned by Google Australia. The report, Future Skills, which was prepared by alphaBeta, found that most Australians will spend 33% more time in education and training across their lifetime by 2040 to keep pace with shifting skills requirements.

Driven by automation and globalisation, tasks across all Australian occupations are set to change by an average of 18% every decade. This means workers who stay in their roles will need to frequently upskill to navigate changes in the way they do their jobs

The Future Skills report states skills will become workers greatest asset as machine-assisted workplaces become more complex, but they will have to spend more time learning, revising and refreshing these skills.

Currently, the average Australia learns more than 80% of their knowledge and skills before the age of 21. However, the report claims that to keep pace with technological change, the average worker will need to triple the time spent on learning after the age of 21. As a result, workplaces will become the most important space for learning and updating skills, pushing training providers to offer more flexible and accessible course structures. Rather than accumulating additional degrees, workers will undertake on-the-job training and short courses that focus directly on the specific skills required.

The report found that it will be a challenge for Australia’s education system to keep up with the increasing demand for lifelong learning as many institutions do not cater for reskilling and upskilling needs.

The C4DE is an initiative that is aiming to fill this gap. By partnering with industry and multiple training institutions (RMIT University, Wodonga TAFE and SuniTAFE), we are developing workplace-delivered training to help businesses keep pace with technological advancements.

Find out more about our workplace training on our Training page.

11 February 2019

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11 February 2019

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