Your sexuality

We are proud of our diverse student population – discrimination or bullying is not tolerated on any level.

If you identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered or intersex or you are questioning your sexuality, then the RMIT University Student Union (RUSU) Queer Department can advocate on your behalf.

If you would like to talk to someone about sex or your sexuality you can contact counselling.

For more information about sexuality and coming out, check out the resources from Reach Out.

Safe sex, respectful relationships and consent

Safe sex

Sex is part of life and it’s important to consider your health and wellbeing when it comes to managing your sexual health, preventing an unwanted pregnancy as well as protecting yourself and others against sexually transmissible infections. The best way to protect yourself and others is to have safe sex.

Remember to always have some protection handy and be aware that alcohol and drugs can have an impact on your ability to make safe decisions.

What are Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs)?

Sexually Transmissible Infections are caused by bacteria, viruses or parasites and are passed from one person to another during sexual contact. They can infect many different parts of the body and often have no obvious symptoms.

Play it safe and use condoms. And if you are having anal sex, make sure you use a condom and water based lubricant.

See what could happen if you have unsafe sex:

Getting a Sexual Health Check

You may want to consider having a sexual health check for lots of reasons, particularly if:

For more information about getting a sexual health check, speak to your GP or visit the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre.

Talk about it

It’s a good idea to talk first about safe sex early on in any relationship.

Lots of people plan on having safe sex particularly with a new partner, but find it hard to bring up the topic of condoms in the heat of the moment or may be worried about what the other person may think. The way you start the conversation will depend on the person and how well you know them.

Sex is meant to be something that makes you both feel good - see how you might bring the conversation up with your partner:

How can I protect myself and my partner?

Be honest with your partner, use protection and water-based lubricant.

For more information about contraception, visit the Better Health Channel website or speak to your GP about your options.

Supplies of condoms, lubricant and dams are available free at RMIT. To find out where to access them, scroll down to the bottom of this page.

Respectful relationships and consent

Having sex should be a fun, safe and positive experience for you and the other person.

You and your partner need to be able to respect each other’s decision at all times, and remember that you or your partner can change your mind about what you are comfortable with. It’s ok to change your mind, and it’s ok for your partner to change their mind too.

If you decide to have any sexual activity, up to and including sex, remember:

  • there must be free agreement.  Both people must be agreeing without ignorance, pressure, coercion, threat or force

  • Do it safely with the use of condoms. Talking about, and using contraception is essential is any respectful sexual relationship.

If you are feeling uncomfortable, unsafe and concerned about threatening or unwanted behaviour, contact Safer Community.

Sexual Assault

If you have experienced unwanted sexual behaviour, you can speak to a counsellor confidentially at CASA House - 9635 3610/1800 806 292

Unplanned pregnancy

When faced with an unplanned or unintended pregnancy, it can cause a lot of confusion and you may be unsure of what to do.

There are support services available for you to discuss your options confidentially.

For more information, support and advice, visit:

Family Planning Victoria

The Royal Women’s Hospital’s Unplanned Pregnancy Support services

More information

See a doctor

Click here for a list of doctors near RMIT.

Phone Nurse on Call
Free health advice from a Registered Nurse 24 hours a day
1300 60 60 24
Get a check

Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
580 Swanston St, Melbourne
03 9341 6200
www.mshc.org.au or          http://testme.org.au/

 

Feeling unsafe or concerned

about your safety

Safer Community
email: safercommunity@rmit.edu.au

RUSU Compass - student welfare drop-in space: www.rusu.rmit.edu.au/compass

Related links:

Red Aware – Sexual health information

The Line – Do you know where to draw the line?

Reach Out – Sex and relationships

Centre Against Sexual Assault

Domestic Violence Resource Centre

 

Condoms on campus

With the exception of abstinence, condoms are the least expensive and most available method of preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

RMIT provides free condoms, lubricant and dental dams at different campus locations.

RMIT provides free condoms, lubricant and dental dams at the following locations.

Service

Campus

Location

RMIT Connect City campus Building 8, Level 4
Brunswick campus Building 514, Level 1
Bundoora campus Building 202, Level 3
Ngarara Willim Centre City campus Building 5, Level 1, Room 1
Counselling Service City campus Building 43 (Cardigan Street)
Compass (Student Union) City campus Building 5, Level 1, Room 17A
City campus Building 57, Level 4
Brunswick campus Building 514, Level 2
Bundoora campus Building 204, Level 1
Women’s Department (Student Union) City campus Building 56, Level 4, Room 80
Brunswick campus Building 515, Level 1, Room 4
Bundoora campus west Building 202, Level 2
Bundoora campus east Building 251 (opposite the cafeteria)
Queer Collective (Student Union) City campus Building 56, Level 4, Room 91
Bundoora campus west Building 202, Level 2

With a bit of practice, condoms are an easy and effective means of preventing unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmissible infections. Always make sure that you have more than one condom in case they get damaged and store your condoms in a cool dark place like a drawer.

Practice makes perfect. If you haven’t used a condom before, practice putting one on before you need to do it for real.

Safe use tips

  1. As semen or pre-cum may leak out as soon as the penis is hard, put the condom on before the penis goes near your partner’s genitals, mouth or anus
  2. Open the packet, being careful not to tear the condom with teeth or fingernails
  3. Squeeze the condom out but don’t unroll it yet
  4. Make sure the condom is the right way up
  5. Squeeze the teat on the tip of the condom to remove the air bubble
  6. For an uncircumcised penis, gently pull back the foreskin
  7. Hold the condom against the tip of the penis
  8. Unroll it all the way down to the base of the penis
  9. Apply a water-based lubricant
  10. Pull out the penis as soon as you cum and before ‘your penis goes soft’
  11. While withdrawing, hold the condom at the base of the penis
  12. Be careful not to allow the condom or the penis to touch your partner’s genitals, mouth or anus as you slip it off
  13. Tie a knot in the top of the condom and put the condom in a rubbish bin.
  14. Don’t flush it down the toilet as it is not biodegradable and may cause your toilet to block up
  15. Don’t throw the used condom where children might pick it up
  16. Wash your hands after removing a condom.

Always use a dental dam for oral-vaginal (cunnilingus) or oral-anal (rimming) sex. They are very effective at reducing the transmission of STIs.

Safe use tips

  1. Remove from bag and rinse powder off with water
  2. Check the dam for holes and perforations
  3. Apply a small amount of water-based lubricant on the vagina or anus
  4. The person performing oral sex should hold the dam against the genitals of the receiving person
  5. Don’t flip the dam over during sessions or use it on two different body areas (eg vagina and anus)
  6. Never reuse a dental dam

More information

Melbourne Sexual Health Centre 
Victoria’s largest specialist sexual health service
580 Swanston St Carlton VIC 3053
Phone 9341 6200

Action Centre for Young People 
Specialist Sexual Health Service for young people in Melbourne’s CBD
Level 1 94 Elizabeth St Melbourne Vic 3000
1800 013 952

QV Medical One 
Free sexual health service in Melbourne’s CBD
Level 3, 23 QV Terrace Melbourne VIC 3000
Phone 8663 7000 (ask for an appointment with sexual health nurse)

Your Local General Practitioner For info on GPs near RMIT check our website.