There are many health issues that affect students. This page provides some quick tips and links to help keep your mind, body and soul healthy.

 

Staying healthy

Making some simple changes to your lifestyle can improve your health; they can also help to prevent many chronic conditions like heart disease or cancer in the long term.

Here are some tips to help you stay healthy.

  • Keep your alcohol consumption to a healthy level and know your limit.
  • Avoid smoking. If you are having trouble quitting, check out some of these tips.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet, high in lean meats, calcium, fruit, vegetables and trace nutrients.
  • Keep active. Research shows that excercising with a friend helps with your motivation to get fitter. Find a friend to exercise with or join a social sport with RMIT Link!
  • Share your feelings and talk about them with those you trust most and find time to rest and relax. Our counselling service can help you with this.
  • Practice safe sex with contraception - regardless of your sex, gender or sexuality.
  • If you are ever worried about a heatlh concern, consult a health professional.

Healthy relationships

Good relationships can keep us happy and healthy and get us through the hard times.

Reach Out has some great advice on building better relationships.

Relationships can turn sour, and if they do, you need to be safe. If you experience violence or sexual assault, visit the Centre Against Sexual Assault for more information. In an emergency call 000 for Police.

Our counselling service can assist with advice and psychological support for students regarding personal and family relationships.

Check out Family Planning Victoria for advice on contraception or unplanned pregnancies.

Sexual health

Sex can be great but it can also carry risks, such as sexually transmitted infection (STI) and unwanted pregnancy. Always use condoms to help protect yourself from catching or passing on an STI.

An STI can be passed from one person to another during unprotected sexual or close genital-to-genital (intimate) contact. Genital or oral sex includes the insertion of penis into the vagina, anus or mouth. Insertion of fingers, sex-toys and other objects may transmit certain STIs if the object is contaminated. 

If you suspect that you have an STI, don't panic. You simply need to be tested, and then treatment can be given if it's needed. Many people with STIs don't get symptoms, so it's worth getting tested even if you feel healthy.

Treatment for STIs is varied, see your GP or call Melbourne Sexual Health Centre.

Women’s breast and reproductive health

Many women’s breast and  reproductive health conditions are easily treated if diagnosed early.

Some preventative things you can do to protect your long term health are:

For more information about specific women’s health matters, visit the Royal Women’s Hospital’s health information website and view the many health fact sheets available in different languages.

Gender transition

Transitioning may involve ‘social transition’, such as changing outward appearance, clothing, mannerisms, and name. 

It may also involve a ‘medical transition’ to align an individual’s body with their gender identity, which may involve gender reassignment surgery and/or hormone replacement therapy.

RMIT's Transitioning at RMIT (PDF 193KB) is a guide to assist staff and students who undertake gender transition. The guide provides practical advice on:

  • the specific needs of the individual who is choosing to transition
  • issues to consider and actions that may be appropriate
  • any support or awareness needed for colleagues or other students.

 The guide aims to build awareness about a topic that may be new to you or those around you, and to minimise confusion and uncertainty as an individual undergoes their transition journey. 

This guide is for anyone who: 

  • may be thinking of, or is transitioning, whether socially or medically
  • may have supervisory responsibility for a person who is gender transitioning
  • may be supporting the wellbeing of the person who is transitioning as they work or study at RMIT
  • works within the student or staff support service areas of the University and who may be asked to provide advice and support in light of an individual’s gender transition.

Support on campus

If you would like to talk to someone about your sex, gender or sexuality, there are services on campus available for information and support:

Useful resources

Andrology Australia – information and resources about male reproductive health disorders.

Better Health Channel – a wide range of health and medical information

BeyondBlue - resources and support for mental health and wellbeing

Breast Screen Victoria - information about breast care and screening tests services

Centre for Sexual Assault - provides victims and survivors of sexual assault with comprehensive and timely support and intervention

Drama Downunder - sexual health check information for gay men

Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria (GLHV) - LGBTI health and wellbeing policy and resource unit (including training and resources)

Health Direct - safe, practical health information and advice

Melbourne Sexual Health Centre a walk in sexual health clinic. Their website has a wide range of sexual health information

Outs and Ins (PDF 140KB) - a booklet about lesbian and bisexual women’s health

Pap Screen provides information about prevention screening tests for cervical cancer.

Royal Women's Hospital Information and advice on a vareity of women's health matters. Offers a translating service for non English speakers

Transgender Victoria  - provides (support materials, workshops/events, and Trans* Anxiety Support Groups for trans* people)

Transitioning at RMIT - A guide to supporting Gender Transition 

Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service is a Victorian state-wide service for women experiencing violence and abuse.

Victorian Aids Council - information about HIV/AIDS and LGBTIQ health