Advanced Diploma of Translating

As part of the Advanced Diploma of Translating program, you will undertake translating simulations and other on-campus learning activities. The following information outlines examples of the fundamental tasks you will be expected to carry out in this program.

These examples are provided for your information only and are not entry requirements.

There are a range of adjustments to your study conditions available to enable and support you to undertake these tasks. Please contact the Equitable Learning Services to discuss any adjustments you may require. 

If you intend to seek national certification by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) on completion of this program, it is advisable you check with NAATI about reasonable adjustments for the certification test.

Verbal expression and comprehension (understanding)

What do I need to be able to do?

Understand and respond to verbal communication.
In translation simulations and class learning activities, this will assist you with understanding and clarifying spoken translation instructions.

Verbally communicate clear instructions and explanations in a time responsive way.
In translation simulations and class learning activities, this will assist you communicating with peers while working on source texts and to reach agreement on translation approaches.

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

Additional time allowances for comprehension and expression will be provided for students in translating simulations and class learning activities.

Social communication

Social Communication refers to the capacity to understand and use appropriate non-verbal communication such as: eye contact, gestures, facial expression, speaking volume, tone of voice, proximity and verbal turn-taking.

What do I need to be able to do?

Recognise, interpret, use and respond to non-verbal communication appropriately in both translating simulations and class learning activities to comprehend and express meaning across languages and cultures and to build relationships and rapport with clients.

In translating simulations and class learning activities, tasks which require your use of social communication abilities include:

  • using non-verbal cues (as listed above) to negotiate and finalise a translation assignment with your client
  • recognising and responding to clients’ non-verbal cues to understand intended meaning

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.  

Consideration will be given to the use of non-verbal communication appropriate to your disability or condition for example, if you have a vision or hearing impairment, you may rely more on using either auditory or visual means of social communication.

Reading

What do I need to be able to do?

Read and understand a range of written material in differing forms from a variety of sources such as: screen-based, image-based and sign/symbol-based texts and handwritten notes.

In translating simulations and class learning activities, tasks which require your use of reading include: 

  • comprehending written instructions for translating simulations
  • understanding written text in English and another language in order to re-express the text into either language in writing, in a timely way

The ability to read, understand and interpret written information is fundamental for the delivery of translation tasks.

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

You may use specialised software to support your literacy for on-campus learning activities.

Writing (Written Language)

N.B. This refers not to the physical act of writing but rather to the written content.

What do I need to be able to do?

Acquire information and produce coherent written communication appropriate to translating simulations and class learning activities.

In translating simulations, tasks which require clear, concise, accurate and time-efficient writing include: 

  • transcribing and translating audio-visual files under time constraint and producing accurate subtitles using assigned software
  • writing texts which demonstrate your understanding of meaning and concepts in English and another language

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

You may use specialised software to support your literacy for on-campus learning activities.

What do I need to be able to do?

Demonstrate translating competence by applying meaning and concepts in dialogue under time constraint in translating simulations.

In translating simulations, tasks requiring your use of high level cognitive skills are:

  • reading and comprehending a 250-word English text and writing this text with the same meaning and concepts in another language, or vice versa, using a computer and under time constraint
  • translating texts which contain ambiguities, requiring you to assess, decide and produce accurate translations.

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

You may use assistive technology and strategies such as rest breaks to support your memory, planning and organisation in translating simulations and class learning activities.

Mental wellness is a state of well-being in which an individual can realise their own abilities or potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life and can work productively and fruitfully.

Behavioural stability refers to an individual’s ability to moderate their own behaviour.
Stable mental health promotes optimal and safe engagement in on-campus learning environments. Many people who live with mental health conditions complete their studies successfully. The following services are available to support students living with mental health conditions at RMIT: 

Equitable Learning Services

Counselling Services

What do I need to be able to do?

The on campus learning environment can be challenging and will require you to engage with peers and teaching staff, reflect on your work and respond appropriately to constructive feedback.

Translating simulations can present complex and unpredictable human situations which require the following:

  • managing multiple demands with engagement, focus and composure
  • managing client content of a sensitive, confronting or traumatic nature with objectivity

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

A range of adjustments such can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you. 

Flexible arrangements for your professional experience placement will be considered. The appropriateness and practicality of these arrangements may vary between placements and agencies and should be discussed with your placement coordinator prior to commencement of the placement. 

You may be supported to take time off from your studies if you become unwell or have difficulties with behavioural stability until you are ready to recommence.

Vision

Visual acuity refers to the extent to which a person can see or interpret visual information. This may also include colour vision.

What do I need to be able to do?

In translating simulations, tasks which require vision include:

  • reading and comprehending text based documents in English, which may include visual elements such as graphics or images. Reproducing the same meaning in another language while incorporating all elements of the original document, and vice versa.
  • checking, editing and finalising the translation of text based documents in a variety of formats including, handwritten, print and electronic formats

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

Adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

The use of assistive technology to enhance vision will be considered. Glasses and other visual aids can be used during on-campus simulation learning activities.

If you have been deemed legally blind or have a medical condition that may impact your vision, it is recommended that you discuss your condition with Equitable Learning Services.

Hearing

What do I need to be able to do?

Translating simulation tasks that require hearing or alternatives (e.g. accurate lip reading, amplification equipment) include:

  • following client oral instructions and explanations
  • listening to audio-visual media in English and another language and reproducing the aural communication into written format using a computer

The capacity to acquire auditory information is necessary for competent and accurate translation.

What adjustments to my study conditions can I access?

Adjustments can be organised through the Equitable Learning Services (ELS). Contact the ELS to discuss what adjustments may be helpful to you.

The use of augmentation such as lip reading and / or assistive technology e.g. ‘power’ amplified equipment  to enhance hearing will be considered.

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business. - Artwork created by Louisa Bloomer

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.