Four degrees in biomedical and health science you may not know about

If you want to pursue a career in health or biomedical science, RMIT’s wide range of courses could put you on the path to an engaging and rewarding career.

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RMIT is a leader in STEM - Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics - and we offer a wide range of health and biomedical sciences courses that lead to careers in fields that are constantly developing, with new opportunities and research available all the time.

Courses in health science can lead you to roles in mental health, nursing, medical science, complementary medicine and more. Biomedical sciences covers pharmaceutical and laboratory fields and can lead you to a role changing lives and communities.

Hear what attracted our alumni to these biomedical and health science courses, and you could find one that suits your personality, skills and passions.

RMIT student, Max.

Study medical radiations and specialise as a nuclear medicine technologist, radiation therapist or diagnostic radiographer.

If you have a passion for helping people, you like working in a team of people contributing to a common goal, and you want to continue learning and developing throughout your career, medical radiations might be your calling. 

With high graduate employment rates from the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Radiations), students go on to work as skilled practitioners in the healthcare sector.  

Graduate Tamika Cassar says she knew the undergraduate degree would suit her, being a practical learner and a team player.

“The field is perfect for someone like myself, who enjoys working in a team, has an interest in science and most importantly, has a strong passion for helping people,” Cassar says. 

“The science behind radiation therapy is very physics-based. Physics was never my strong suit in high school and it almost deferred me from studying the course, but with the support of teachers, students and professionals, I improved.

“We had 22 weeks of placement in the course, which was a great opportunity to make connections with other practitioners, develop professional relationships and get an insight of where I would like to work.” 

Graduate Jennie Diep was interested in science and the human body, and wanted to work in an interactive environment.

“Medical radiations ticked both of those boxes: you have to have a thorough understanding of anatomy and an ability to positively interact with patients and health professionals,” Diep says. 

“As part of my studies, I had the opportunity to complete clinical placements at Peninsula Health, Monash Health and Bendigo Health. Working with real patients gave me a valuable insight into what it takes to be a radiographer. After I graduated I secured a job as an intern at Monash Health, and my goal is to eventually work in MRI or ultrasound.”

Undergraduate students

Decide what's next

At RMIT, the future is yours for the making. Choose cutting-edge facilities, global opportunities and industry-led courses at the forefront of change. 

Study pharmaceutical science to bring new treatments to the people who need them.

If you’re interested in how medicines treat disease and a career in drug development, drug testing and drug certification where you can be actively involved in improving Australia’s health, studying pharmaceutical science could be for you. The Australian Government’s Job Outlook shows very strong job growth, with the number of people working as Pharmacists (in their main job) growing from 22,500 in 2014 to 29,600 in 2019. 

In the Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, you’ll learn the science of developing new medicines, about the human body and the use of drugs to treat disease. 

Duncan Maher chose to study pharmaceutical sciences at RMIT because of the 40-week industry placement and his interest in providing healthcare solutions.

“I love what I do because it gives me the ability to impact on lives across the globe,” Maher says.  

“My dream job is to work in research and development to help provide affordable and effective medicines to all people.

“I completed my placement at Ipsen Pharmaceuticals, working in medical affairs and providing patients and healthcare professionals with information on Ipsen products. The placement allowed me to use the theory and lab skills I’d gained over the previous three years and apply them to real life situations in the pharmaceutical industry, and it taught me how crucial medical information is to both patients and healthcare professionals.” 

Graduate of the course Juliana Odisho says the volume of new ideas and developments in the pharmaceutical industry gave her an interest in working in pharmaceutical research.

“I’m enthusiastic, generous, very committed and I love helping those in need,” Odisho says. 

“I chose to study pharmaceutical sciences at RMIT because the program covered many different career pathways. I gained knowledge in many areas including lab techniques, drug development, ethics, governance, clinical trial (research), pre-clinical testing and basic drug regulations.”

Study biomedical science if you want to treat diseases, work in cancer research, be a medical scientist or research stem cells.

If you enjoy human biology, chemistry and cell biology and hands-on laboratory work, RMIT’s biomedical science will give you real experience and guidance from industry professionals.

The Bachelor of Biomedical Science can lead you to work in fields like genetic engineering, cancer research, neuroscience, DNA profile and stem cell research. This course is also recognised as a pathway into Medicine and Vet studies at other universities. 

Graduates of the Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Laboratory Medicine) play a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, working as part of a team with doctors, pathologists, scientists, technicians and laboratory assistants. Doctors use information provided by medical laboratory scientists to inform their decisions in a lot of cases. Job Outlook shows the number of people working as Medical Laboratory Scientists (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years: from 16,200 in 2014 to 24,100 in 2019.

When Sarah Hawksworth was studying Laboratory Medicine, she gravitated towards the hands-on subjects where students learn how the whole body works. 

“I enjoy getting to do lots of hands-on laboratory work, which was most of my subjects!” Hawksworth says.

“I loved the microscope work in Histology, Cytopathology and Haematology and the practicals in Biochemistry, Microbiology and Histopathology. The amount of laboratory work and professional placement sets this degree apart from other biomedicine degrees. 

“During the first year we had a tour of one of the Melbourne hospitals, which gave us the opportunity to actually see the environment that we would end up working in.”

Sumaia El Sayed chose to study the Bachelor of Biomedical Science because of its industry connections and facilities, and she says the diverse subject choice gave her a clearer idea of where she wanted to work. 

“I’ve always had a passion for biology, the human body and disease, so studying biomedical science was the right choice for me,” El Sayed says.

“Microbiology was my favourite subject, I found it fascinating learning about organisms and their effect on the human body and the environment. My dream job is to work in immunology or undertake research into molecular biology of proteins.” 

 

Story: Hilary Jones

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business. - Artwork created by Louisa Bloomer

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.