Four ways health and biomed lets you get hands-on and technical

When you’re aiming to land a career in health, it’s important to gain the right hands-on learning. Health and biomedical science study at RMIT is the best way to do this.

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Your path through university should be paved with experiences that give you insights into your future work, especially in hands-on fields like health and biomedical science.  

Not only do immersive learning opportunities colour your study with exciting and inspiring moments, but they’re a safe way to prepare you for your future career in health facilities, labs or hospital environments.  

Here are just a few of the hands-on learning experiences you may experience in a biomedical science or health course at RMIT. 

1. Practice caring for a patient with the ALS SimMan  

The ALS SimMan, also referred to as a high-fidelity manikin, is an immersive piece of tech that simulates an almost real patient in a hospital environment. This faux patient and its surrounding facilities are used in the teaching of nursing, but also other disciplines such as pharmaceutical science. 

These manikins are used to teach students about numerous health conditions and provide them with practice interacting with patients. You can measure several physiological parameters on the manikin, including blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate. You can even ask the manikin questions that it will respond to as if it were a real patient. What’s more is that the manikins can be administered medication, which is where a Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Sciences student will get hands-on experience. 

The practical learning opportunities that the ALS SimMan facilitates not only gives an immersive learning experience that translates to the real-world, but it also situates you in an immersive hospital environment giving you a taste of what working with patients can really be like. 

2. Make industry connections and gain real-world experience in placements 

Many of RMIT’s health and biomedical science courses, such as the Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Laboratory Medicine) and the Master of Laboratory Medicine, give you the chance to undertake industry-connected placements in real-world environments. 

What’s next stems from here with the addition of new majors and minors in health courses, as well as new first year foundational subjects.

Called the foundations in health, these subjects are designed to help you learn the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology, as well as develop your communication skills and professional skills. They will also introduce you to factors that impact the health of individuals, particularly our First Nations people. This common first year block gives you the skills to pursue a broad range of careers and makes it easier than ever to transfer into another course in health or biomedical sciences.

Industry placements give you the chance to put your studies and experiences into practice. Throughout a biomedical or health science bachelor your placements may give you your first chance to cement the skills you’ve learned throughout your studies in a real-world environment.  

You’ll also make connections with our industry partners, such as Northern Health or VetCheck Technologies, who will enrich your learning experience and provide professional contacts for your future career in health.  

Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Laboratory Medicine) Cassandra Kennedy described placement as being one of the most valuable opportunities she had during her studies.  

“I had the privilege of undergoing a work placement at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in the haematology and transfusion laboratory,” said Cassandra. “I was able to make valuable contacts and gain essential experience within the laboratory which enabled me to gain full-time employment as a Trainee Scientist at St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne before even graduating from my degree.” 

Depending on where you end up in your placements, you may also glimpse some of the cutting-edge technology that is used in cutting-edge lab and hospital environments. 

3. Be at the cutting-edge of technology by using the Anatomage Table

Health facilities aren’t the only places to find the latest technology. Introducing the Anatomage Table, a 3D anatomy visualisation and virtual dissection tool that is used in the digital human bioscience facilities at RMIT.  

The Anatomage Table provides a digital cadaver that allows students and academics the opportunity to digitally dissect the anatomical systems of the body in a dynamic way. The table allows users to ‘remove’ various elements of the body, such as skin, the cardiovascular system or specific organs, so different views of anatomy can be achieved for teaching or learning.  

This tool makes it easier than ever to gain practical experience in anatomy and dissection. With this advanced technology, you can study the anatomical systems of the human body without ever needing to lift a scalpel. 

4. Get hands-on learning with specialised equipment in the medical radiation labs

In courses such as the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Radiations) and the Master of Medical Physics, specialised laboratories are needed for the hands-on aspects of teaching and learning. This is where RMIT’s medical radiation labs come into play. 

These labs are expansive and contain many facilities, from the Medical Imaging facilities to the Nuclear Medicine facilities. The latter of which has equipment that allows students to learn the delicate process of combining a radioactive isotope with a pharmaceutical component to produce a radiolabelled-pharmaceuticals. In these labs students engage in practical learning that demonstrates how some of the most delicate medical manufacturing occurs, from syringe shields to lead vial pots.  

Another set of facilities within these labs allows students to undertake a simulation of radiation therapy treatment using VR technology. Called the Virtual Environment Radiotherapy Trainer system, these simulations include planning, image-guided radiation therapy and radiation therapy delivery. This is just one of many simulated teaching experiences in the medical radiation labs that will prepare you a specialised health career. 

What next stems from here in health and biomedical science courses that allow you to pursue your passion, while also gaining the practical skills you need to make a difference in your future career in health. 

Story: Jacob Johnston

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Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.