Decoding queer technology with RMIT student Joel Humphries

Decoding queer technology with RMIT student Joel Humphries

Masters’ student Joel Humphries wants to disrupt your perception of technology.

In a recent interview with RMIT,  we spoke Naarm-based writer Joel as he explores new ways of building and interacting with technology that has queer objectives, and shares real life examples of queer technology.

“I think it’s beneficial for us to understand queerness as more than just an identity, but as a way of life,” says Joel. “I want to look at how queer identity can uniquely influence and shape our technologies.”

Tell us a little bit about yourself? 

I’m a writer, amongst many other things, in my last semester of the Master of Writing and Publishing at RMIT. 

Is queer technology something you have interacted with in practice?  

Yes, a great example of queer technology would be Queering the Map. It’s a community generated counter-map of the world, documenting queer experiences in relation to physical space. 

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I think its beneficial for us to understand queerness as more than just an identity, but as a way of life. We obviously can, and should, fight to be represented in the tech industry and beyond, but once we are in these positions, I want to look at how queer identity can uniquely influence and shape our technologies.

Where can we learn more about the concept of queer technology?  

You can check out my newsletter, Queer Computer. Each issue is a deep dive into a topic, person, or project connected to queerness and technology. It investigates all those overhyped techy things like NFTs, the metaverse, and web3 from an accessible and queer perspective, and also uncovers exciting queer initiatives, games, and tech history. 

Story: Jessica Ankomah

15 August 2022

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