Using articles, journals and newspapers

Embedding and linking

Embedding and linking to articles removes many copyright problems. Where possible, link or embed an article, instead of scanning, photocopying, or downloading/uploading.

Using snippets and quotes

You can use snippets or quotes from books without permission from the rights holder if the quote taken is not a “substantial part” of the original work. You must attribute the author. Whether a quote is considered substantial or not, is measured by importance rather than the amount copied and can be difficult to quantify.  Check the Quotes and Extracts guide (Australian Copyright Council) for advice.

Scanning

You can scan articles under the fair dealing provisions for the purposes of research and study, and criticism and review. You are allowed to scan:

  • one article from a journal issue
  • more articles if their subject matter is related or if the use of the article is for the same course or research.

For your research or study purposes, you can store scanned articles online for the duration of your course only.  You must store them behind a password and not make them available to anyone else. Fair dealing for research and study does not apply to public use.

Printing and photocopying

You can print copies of articles under the fair dealing provisions. You may print copies from websites or photocopy articles from printed copies of newspapers or journals.

You are allowed to print or photocopy:

  • one article from a journal issue
  • more articles if their subject matter is related or if the use of the article is for the same course or research.

Sources of articles, journals and newspapers

Institutional repositories and open access journals

Open access journals and institutional repositories contain scholarly academic articles that are available online. You can link to, embed, download and print articles within these repositories. A list of repositories in Australian and New Zealand universities is available from the Australasian Open Access Repositories site.

To find open access resources, go to:

Downloading from Library databases

The majority of Library databases allow you to:

  • download and use a single copy of an article for personal research purposes.
  • share links to articles
  • print articles directly from the database.

 The databases do not allow you to:

  • download and share articles by email or social media
  • upload copies to websites and open publishing platforms, including learning platforms, such as Canvas
  • photocopy and share printed articles.

If you'd like to share articles with your fellow students, send them the links.

Go to Journals and newspapers in LibrarySearch to find licensed e-journals.

Downloading from websites

You can download articles under the fair dealing provisions for the purposes of research and study, and criticism and review. You are allowed to download:

  • one article from a journal issue
  • more articles if their subject matter is related or if the use of the article is for the same course or research.

For your research or study purposes, you can store downloaded articles for the duration of your course only. You must store them behind a password and not make them available to anyone else. Fair dealing for research and study does not apply to public use. 


Was this page helpful?