Blockchain strategy course prepares students for jobs of the future

From crypto start-ups to established enterprises, global demand for blockchain expertise makes it one of the hottest areas for technology recruitment.

The new course will develop strategic understanding of blockchain and its application to industry and business.

In response to the growing importance of blockchain as an emerging industry and in collaboration with industry, RMIT has launched Australia’s first university short course on blockchain strategy.

With blockchain development now the second-hottest skill in the job market, students will have the opportunity to develop in-demand experience, including strategic understanding of blockchain and how to apply it to their industry and business.

Commencing on 19 March, the eight-week course is expected to be of particular interest to business leaders and the next generation of entrepreneurs, with opportunities to develop strong networks within the blockchain community.

Vice-Chancellor and President, Martin Bean CBE, said the course harnessed the creativity and entrepreneurship that RMIT was renowned for, giving students the knowledge they needed to be ready for life and work and to succeed in the 21st century workforce.

“Blockchain is now becoming a core part of contemporary digital literacy and we’re delighted to offer an industry-focused program built in collaboration with our partners at Accenture and Stone and Chalk, as well as the Blockchain Innovation Hub,” Martin said.

Accenture Australia and New Zealand Managing Director for Financial Services Technology Consulting, John Harris, said blockchain had the potential to create profound and positive change across business and society in Australia, disrupting a diverse range of industries in banking and beyond.

“Our partnership with RMIT Online is another example of Accenture’s work with leaders across industry, government and academia to move technology forward and improve the way Australia lives, works, plays and grows,” he said.

Stone and Chalk Melbourne General Manager, Alan Tsen, said they had been in discussions with businesses and governments for years around the emergence of blockchain and how it will impact their industry.  

“Banks are already behind blockchain technology in a big way. There is a real demand for blockchain training and a skills gap in the market that needs to be addressed," he said.

RMIT Online CEO Helen Souness said blockchain would play a critical role in the future of business, with its application already prevalent across multiple industries including finance, government, energy and health care.  

“With every major innovation in technology comes great opportunities and new risks," she said.  

"At RMIT Online, we believe individuals and businesses need to understand technology quickly, to adapt their strategy to meet these opportunities.  This course aims to do that.”

Developing Blockchain Strategy will take students through the following:

  • Conceptual understanding of blockchain technology
  • Conceptual understanding of potential impact of blockchain on wider society
  • Use case across different industries
  • Blockchain value propositions
  • Strategic frameworks for applying blockchain to your business
  • Deeper technical understanding and application of blockchain and blockchain environments.

The first intake of the course will cost $1,300.

Find out more about studying Developing Blockchain Strategy.

Story: Shelley Brady

20 February 2018

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20 February 2018

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  • Industry
  • Business
  • Science and technology
  • Blockchain
  • Future World of Work

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