ATSB and RMIT partner in transport safety investigation

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has announced a strategic partnership with RMIT that will see the University offer Transport Safety Investigator qualifications.

RMIT Associate Dean of Engineering, Aerospace Engineering and Aviation, Professor Pier Marzocca; ATSB Commissioner Chris Manning; RMIT Vice-Chancellor and President Martin Bean CBE; and ATSB Program Advisor Linda Spurr at the Strategic Partnership Agreement signing.

Until now the ATSB has conducted its own nationally accredited Diploma of Transport Safety Investigation training in-house.

But under a new partnership announced at the Australian International Air Show, RMIT will soon be offering a Graduate Certificate in Transport Safety Investigation, which encompasses the aviation, marine and rail transport modes.

Longer term, the Graduate Certificate qualification will create a pathway to further higher education programs leading to Graduate Diploma and Masters-level qualifications.

The partnership will provide industry in Australia and throughout the Asia-Pacific region with access to high quality, ATSB-sponsored training in transport accident investigation, as well providing a framework to facilitate important transport safety related research through a credible university-based methodology,

RMIT Vice Chancellor and President, Martin Bean CBE said the partnership with the ATSB was an historic one.

“Together we will work to improve transport safety throughout the Asia Pacific region, across aviation, maritime, and rail industries.”

“To achieve this, we will co-create and deliver tertiary level transport accident investigation qualifications to both the ATSB staff and the broader transport safety sector”, Martin said.  

“The relationship will also involve a range of collaborative research projects which will bring together RMIT’s deep expertise in delivering world-leading research with the ATSB’s considerable industry knowledge, intelligence and data access. Through this relationship we hope to facilitate an industry-wide capability improvement program throughout the Asia Pacific region.”

ATSB Chief Commissioner, Mr Greg Hood said the new partnership was another key enabler that would support the Bureau to achieve its primary objective of improving transport safety through greater collaboration with a strong and highly credible research-led teaching and learning institution.

“This is a truly strategic partnership. Creating an offering where personnel can obtain and apply these qualifications within their respective industries will complement and enhance the ATSB’s primary objective of improving transport safety for all Australians,” Mr Hood said.

“RMIT has offered a long-term vision to support the partnership and proposes to create a centre of excellence in the field of accident investigation and transport safety in the Asia-Pacific region.”

“One behalf of the ATSB, I look forward to a long and productive partnership with RMIT and I look forward to seeing the Master’s program mature over the next couple of years.”

Further information on the Graduate Certificate in Transport Safety Investigation can be found on the RMIT website.

 

Story: Karen Phelan

27 February 2019

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27 February 2019

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