Society and Environment

Six ways to keep Melbourne moving at 8 million

More people living in Melbourne means more trips across our transport network. RMIT experts share their views on how to plan for this pressure and keep our city moving.

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Six ways to keep Melbourne moving at 8 million

More people living in Melbourne means more trips across our transport network. RMIT experts share their views on how to plan for this pressure and keep our city moving.

Read the story

How could degrowth tackle environmental issues and social inequities?

Successful economies are characterised by growth, so how can “degrowth” in our cities and housing possibly be good for us? Urban academic Anitra Nelson explains.

Six ways to keep Melbourne moving at 8 million

More people living in Melbourne means more trips across our transport network. RMIT experts share their views on how to plan for this pressure and keep our city moving.

A gross miscarriage of justice?

Criminology and Justice expert Associate Professor Michele Ruyters shares her insights into the murder of Albert Snowball, which saw one man acquitted and another convicted.

Staff and alumni recognised with Australia Day honours

Adjunct Professor Sue Maslin has joined former staff members and alumni on the 2019 Australia Day honours list.

Drunk history: Bottle shops, urban life and public order

From colonial times to our suburban spread, the humble bottle shop has been surprisingly central in urban attempts to create order and contain violence - but it’s a complicated history.

Future-focused: Vietnam’s next decade looking bright

Our experts look to the future and share their insights about the Vietnamese economy and its start-up culture, anywhere working and tourism.

Inactive Aussie kids en route to becoming a backseat generation

Australian kids are at risk of becoming a backseat generation with more than a third of primary schoolchildren not walking or riding to school despite living nearby, new research shows.

Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks

How can you recycle the world’s stockpiles of treated sewage sludge and boost sustainability in the construction industry, all at the same time? Turn those biosolids into bricks.

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