RMIT students bust 4 myths about business degrees

Group of students with RMIT Vice Chancellor, Martin Bean

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People often think business degrees are meant for competitive overachievers or those who wish to pursue corporate jobs, but this is far from the truth.

There are plenty of similar myths about business degrees. So we got two students from RMIT’s College of Business to bust four of the most common ones. Joie Yap is currently majoring in marketing and Ray Lee is a recent graduate with a major in business management.

Myth: It’s important to be good at math

group of students

Reality: Creativity and leadership skills are just as critical

Those majoring in accounting or economics should definitely have a head for numbers, but that’s not the only important skill. It’s also crucial to be able to come up with creative ideas and solutions to stand out from the crowd. Extra-curricular activities can be very helpful in cultivating these practical skills.

“I was part of the student council, and it made my uni life rather colourful,” says Ray. “As part of the executive board, my free time was usually spent planning activities and interacting with other student councillors, which in turn gave me confidence and strengthened my leadership abilities.”

Myth: The environment is so cut-throat you won't enjoy yourself

Reality: You’ll be able to find an empathetic support network 

“I really enjoyed my university life,” says Ray. “In my experience, the environment is more supportive than competitive as students are happy to share resources.”

RMIT also provides the necessary platforms for students to form bonds and get to know each other better. The pressures of a rigorous education system can be many, and these are eased by working together, not to mention the strong networks that one develops.

“We have orientation camps for freshmen at the start of each semester and student welfare events to encourage students to relax,” shares Joie.

Joie Yap Joie Yap

Myth: There’s no better place to learn people skills than in the real world

Reality: You pick up these skills while working on projects

While these skills can’t be learnt from textbooks or lectures, students are required to complete group projects, which involve working in teams. This means navigating different work styles and personalities.

“When rushing for deadlines, we not only need to meet the objectives of our projects but also manage the relationships we have with our group mates,” says Joie. “It’s through working with others that I’ve learnt to be a better listener, better advisor and better communicator when the situation calls for it.”

Myth: Business graduates often end up in desk-bound jobs

Male student Ray Lee Ray Lee

Reality: Students have the opportunity to pursue a wide range of career paths

While a significant number of business students may wish to pursue successful careers in banks, accounting firms or multinational companies after graduation, these are not their only options.

“The scope of courses in business schools is quite diverse and opens up opportunities for jobs in different fields besides banking and finance, including events management and even human resources,” says Ray.

Joie has the same sentiments. That’s why she is currently working part-time as a fashion coordinator in a retail store while studying at RMIT instead of being in an administrative job. The role gives her great satisfaction as she can “interact, engage with and help customers” and apply the negotiation and people skills she learns from her course in a practical setting.

If you too are interested in a well-rounded degree that will equip you with essential skills that are relevant for a wide range of jobs, a business degree at RMIT might be the right place to start. 

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business. - Artwork created by Louisa Bloomer

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.