Air Quality Monitoring Stations in Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam)

The air quality project was initiated in 2019 by the US Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, and implemented and executed by RMIT University in coordination with UNICEF Vietnam, Saigon Innovation Hub and Clean Air Asia.

The air quality project was initiated in 2019 by the US Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, and implemented and executed by RMIT University in coordination with UNICEF Vietnam, Saigon Innovation Hub and Clean Air Asia. 

Thirteen Air Quality Monitors (AQM) have been installed at local schools and social organisations across Ho Chi Minh City, in an effort to raise awareness of the increasing levels of air pollution.

The RMIT project team, led by Lecturer Nguyen Huu Nhan, worked closely with local schools and social groups to install 13 AQMs across eight districts to teach children more about the air that they breathe.

According to Mr Nhan, the positive impact of the installations was already emerging. Since installing an AQM at Thanh Da Secondary School, students have become more willing and proactive in environmental movements including sorting rubbish, reducing waste, planting trees and wearing face masks to assist with air filtering

With the 13 new installations, the number of operating AQMs in Ho Chi Minh City now totals 18. Users can access to air quality index measured by the AQMs on AirVisual mobile application. The data collected from the AQMs is expected to become a useful source for policymakers, government, industry and schools to revise the traffic and infrastructure system and waste disposal, and consider other environmental solutions.

Project timeline: 2019-2020

Key contributors: Nguyen Huu Nhan

This project addresses the following Sustainable Development Goals and Targets:

3.9 By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination.

4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.

12.8 By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.

17.16 Enhance the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals in all countries, in particular developing countries.

17.17 Encourage and promote effective public, publicprivate and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships.

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.