Controlling vibrations to reduce driver drowsiness

This project aims to reduce driver drowsiness by developing fundamental knowledge on vibration induced drowsiness and by identifying a novel active intermittent vibration regime to maintain driver alertness.

The project expects to generate new knowledge on the physiological response of humans to vibration and to develop a new approach to counteract drowsiness. Expected outcomes of this project include a new method to predict the effects of physical vibration on driver drowsiness, and an innovative optimal regime of actively delivering intermittent vibration to counteract drowsiness. This should provide the significant benefit of reducing transportation injuries and deaths by enabling the design of safer transport vehicles.

Project timeline: 2017 - ongoing

Key contributors: Mohammad Fard and Stephen Robinson

Find out more: Snooze mobiles: how vibrations in cars make drivers sleepy

Image of PhD researcher Neng Zhang

This project addresses the following Sustainable Development Goals and Targets:

3.6 By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents

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Get in touch

For more information or to discuss partnership and collaboration opportunities, email us at SDGs@rmit.edu.au.

For more information about RMIT’s sustainability commitments and activities visit www.rmit.edu.au/sustainability

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Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.