Digital technologies

BHRIGHT’s Technology theme tackles some of the biggest human rights issues emerging from the increasing pervasiveness of tech in our daily lives.

From Atlassian to Uber; from Canberra to Washington, we are now all interconnected. Actors and organisations across the globe can produce direct or indirect effects on Australians’ human rights. Our work focuses on risks posed by emerging tech to privacy (including children’s privacy), democracy, Economic, Social & Cultural rights, equality and justice. The potential benefits of tech for human rights are also explored, including tracking goods through supply chains, enabling activism and access to knowledge.

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Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.