The EU’s Role in the Implementation of the SDGs in Asia Pacific

The Jean Monnet Sustainable Development Goals Network brings together researchers, policy think tanks and Non-Government Organisations who share a primary interest in enhancing the effective contribution of the EU to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the Asia Pacific. It is supported by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.

In September 2015, the United Nations unanimously adopted the 2030 Agenda, seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to shape international efforts to promote a sustainable, peaceful and equitable world by 2030. Each Goal is accompanied by a set of more specific targets with indicators to measure progress.

The European Union (EU) is the global leader in development policy and aid. The EU was an active contributor throughout the process of the development of the SDGs. In June 2016, the EU released Shared Vision, Common Action: A Stronger Europe, the EU’s Global Strategy for its Foreign and Security Policy. It aims for global prosperity and speaks about building resilient societies which require fulfilling the SDGs worldwide. In November 2016, the European Commission released a statement for the EU institutions: Proposal for a new European Consensus on Development – Our World, our Dignity, our Future. The paper outlined a framework for implementation of the SDGs under the priorities of People, Planet, Prosperity and Peace. It emphasised that the Goals can best be met through enhanced cooperation of the EU and its Member States which is possible only through the EU integration process. Since then, this principle of collaboration and implementation has been reinforced for EU Member States and Asian nations through forums such as the Asia-Europe Meeting and the Asia-Europe Foundation. In the European Union, the SDGs are a central pillar of internal and external policy and action, across all levels of governance.

The Jean Monnet Sustainable Development Goals Network was established in 2017. The Network formalises the relationships amongst researchers, policy think tanks and Non-Government Organisations who share a primary interest in enhancing the effective contribution of the EU to the implementation of the SDGs in the Asia Pacific.

By strengthening collaboration amongst researchers and policy makers, the Network promotes a more effective evidence-base for EU institutions to engage with nations in the region to implement the SDGs. Its core question is: how can European Union integration be more effective in supporting the implementation of the SDGs in Asia and the Pacific than would be possible for individual Member States? How can this role be developed further?

For more information, please subscribe to the EU Centre’s mailing list or contact us directly.    

The Jean Monnet SDG Network is co-funded by the Jean Monnet Activities Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union. Project number: 587660-EPP-1-2017-1-AU-EPPJMO-NETWORK.    

Jean Monnet Sustainable Development Goals Network Seminar Series

The European Union Centre is pleased to announce a seminar series that will address each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Each seminar will focus on one Goal, offering an opportunity to explore the intent of the Goal, its targets, and some of the initiatives being undertaken to deliver on the targets. Each seminar will be accompanied by a Policy Brief.

In 2019, seminars will be held at RMIT University on the first Tuesday of the month, from 12.30-2pm.

The Network is also on the lookout for researchers, policy-makers and practitioners who would like to participate in our series as panellists or briefing paper authors, or both. If you are interested in participating, please contact us.    

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Panellists

Dr Mathew Doidge, National Centre for Research on Europe, University of Canterbury (NZ)

Dr Renzo Mori Junior, Senior Advisor, Sustainable Development, RMIT University

Professor Simon Feeny, International Development and Trade Research Group, School of Economics, Finance and Marketing, RMIT University

Chair: Emma Shortis, Research Officer, EU Centre, RMIT University

Find out more about this event.

Policy Brief:

SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere
By Dr Mathew Doidge and Dr Serena Kelly
National Centre for Research on Europe
University of Canterbury, New Zealand    

Tuesday, 26 February 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy Brief:

SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

by Associate Professor Lauren Rickards
and Dr Emma Shortis
School of Global, Urban and Social Studies
RMIT University

Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger, aims to ‘end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.’ Amid rising calls to address food security and mitigate the effects of climate change through radical change to global food and agricultural systems, this seminar will address SDG2 through the lens of both the local and the global. Panellists will address the question of food security at the local level, discussing how this connects to global agricultural production and the local and global threat posed by climate change.

Panellists

Associate Professor Lauren Rickards
Co-Leader, Climate Change and Resilience Research Program, Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University

Lauren’s research uses qualitative approaches to unpick the bio-politics and environmental justice implications of climate change, the Anthropocene and responses to them, including the rise of resilience thinking. Projects include analyses of the official and unofficial narratives about the Hazelwood coal mine fire, how scenario planning is perceived and used for climate change adaptation within government, rural communities’ experiences of the Millennium Drought and subsequent floods, challenges raised by the implementation of resilience agendas, and questions prompted by the Tasmanian bushfires about which life forms we value in the Anthropocene and why.

Lauren has also empirically investigated the philosophical, political and practical challenges of doing interdisciplinary research, particularly for qualitative researchers. She has an extensive range of collaborators within and beyond Australia and was a contributing author to the 2014 IPCC Working Group Two Report on Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability.

Nikki Robinson, Prevention Coordinator
Claire Tartaro, Food Security Officer – Latrobe
Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership

Nikki Robinson and Claire Tartaro’s roles at the Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership involve the coordination of the Baw Baw Food Security Coalition and the community-led food security coalition known as Food For All Latrobe Valley. Nikki and Claire both utilise co-design and collective impact principles in their roles to develop partnerships between the community, local organisations, producers, retailers and local government as they work towards sustainable food solutions across Gippsland.

Chair: Emma Shortis, Research Officer, EU Centre, RMIT University

Light refreshments will be served.

This is a free event.

Registration is essential. To RSVP, click here.

Accessibility Information

An accessibility/mobility access map is available to download here (please scroll to the end of the webpage). RMIT’s Building 1 can be accessed via the adjacent Building 21. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like further information.

About the Jean Monnet Sustainable Development Goals Network

The Jean Monnet SDG Network brings together researchers from the EU Centre at RMIT University, the National Centre for Research on Europe, the University of Canterbury (NZ), The University of Glasgow, the Centre for European Studies, Australian National University (ANU), and the European Union Centre in Singapore (NUS).

The Network formalises relationships amongst researchers, policy think tanks and Non-Government Organisations who share a primary interest in enhancing the effective contribution of the EU to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the Asia Pacific. By strengthening collaboration amongst researchers and policy makers, the Network promotes a more effective evidence-base for EU institutions to engage with nations in the region to implement the SDGs. Its core question is: how can European Union integration be more effective in supporting the implementation of the SDGs in Asia and the Pacific than would be possible for individual Member States? How can this role be developed further?

For more information, or to be added to our mailing list, contact emma.shortis@rmit.edu.au

For daily news and updates follow the EU Centre at RMIT on Twitter: @RMIT_EU_CENTRE

The Jean Monnet SDG Network is supported by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.    

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Tuesday, 26 March 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy Brief:

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

By Dr Debbi Long
Senior Lecturer, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies
RMIT University

Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well Being, aims to ‘ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.’ Amid rising recognition of the impact of climate change on health and an increasing international focus on measuring and defining ‘well-being,’ this seminar will address SDG3 through the lens of both the local and the global.

Registration is essential. To RSVP, click here.

Light refreshments will be served.

This is a free event.

Panellists

Chair: Dr Debbi Long

Senior Lecturer, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University

Debbi is a medical/health anthropologist with research and consultancy experience in a broad range of clinical, organisational, community and development health settings. She has undertaken fieldwork in Turkey, Swaziland/eSwatini and in a variety of contexts in the Australian health system.

Associate Professor Tilman Ruff

Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne

A Nobel Laureate and Member of the Order of Australia, Tilman is an infectious diseases and public health physician. He is the international medical advisor for Australian Red Cross; Co-President of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War; and founding international and Australian Chair of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), who were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2017.

Alice Singo

PhD Candidate, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University

Alice is a nurse/midwife whose work in the area of child health in her home country, Malawi, has been followed by her undertaking a Masters of Public Health at Melbourne University. She has now begun her PhD at RMIT, looking at cross cultural aspects of infant and child mortality.

Naomi Francis

PhD Candidate, Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne

Naomi is an engineer and development consultant, working and researching in water, sanitation, hygiene and health in low-income settings. She is currently completing her PhD at the University of Melbourne’s Nossal Institute for Global Health, on water, sanitation and hygiene in remote villages in Timor-Leste. 

Dr Asiel Yair Adan Sanchez

Lecturer, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Monash University

Asiel is Mexican-Australian medical doctor, development practitioner, activist, poet and writer. They are currently undertaking specialist GP training, and teaching in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at Monash University. Their published research is in the areas of sexual health, mental health, young people and gender inclusion.    

Accessibility Information

An accessibility/mobility access map is available to download here (please scroll to the end of the webpage). RMIT’s Building 1 can be accessed via the adjacent Building 21. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like further information.

About the Jean Monnet Sustainable Development Goals Network

The Jean Monnet SDG Network formalises relationships amongst researchers, policy think tanks and Non-Government Organisations who share a primary interest in enhancing the effective contribution of the EU to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the Asia Pacific. By strengthening collaboration amongst researchers and policy makers, the Network promotes a more effective evidence-base for EU institutions to engage with nations in the region to implement the SDGs. Its core question is: how can European Union integration be more effective in supporting the implementation of the SDGs in Asia and the Pacific than would be possible for individual Member States? How can this role be developed further?

For more information, or to be added to our mailing list, contact emma.shortis@rmit.edu.au    

SDG4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Tuesday, 7 May 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy Brief:

SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

By Associate Professor Jose Roberto Guevara
RMIT University

The seminar on SDG4 was convened by Associate Professor Roberto Guevara, from the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT University.

More information here.

SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Tuesday, 28 May 2019, 5:00pm–6:30pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief:

SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Lavinia Hirsu, Lamiah Hashemi, and Zenaida Quezada-Reyes,
University of Glasgow, University of Kurdistan, Philippine Normal University

Sustainable Development Goal 5, Gender Equality, aims to 'Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.' Amid rising recognition of the impact of gender discrimination on all aspects of life, this seminar will address SDG5 through the lens of both the local and the global.

Registration and more information is available here

Panellists

Professor Katherine Johnson, Director, Social & Global Studies Centre, RMIT University

Dr Lavinia Hirsu, Lecturer in Applied Linguistics, Composition and English as a Foreign Language, School of Education, University of Glasgow

SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Tuesday, 30 July 2019 12.30–2.00pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief:

SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

By Naomi Francis, Nossal Institute for Global Health and the School of Social and Political Sciences

University of Melbourne

In 2018, the UN found that ‘Too many people still lack access to safely managed water supplies and sanitation facilities. Water scarcity, flooding and lack of proper wastewater management also hinder social and economic development.

Increasing water efficiency and improving water management are critical to balancing the competing and growing water demands from various sectors and users.’ Amid rising recognition of the impact of climate change on water and sanitation, and in the midst of a heated national debate about water management, this seminar will address SDG6 through the lens of both the local and the global.

Panellists

Chair: Naomi Francis

Naomi is an engineer and development consultant, working and researching in water, sanitation, hygiene and health in low-income settings. She is currently completing her PhD at the University of Melbourne’s Nossal Institute for Global Health, on water, sanitation and hygiene in remote villages in Timor-Leste. Naomi is also a research fellow at the University of Melbourne’s School of Social and Political Sciences exploring a women’s empowerment program (MAMPU) in Indonesia in partnership with the University of Gadjah Mada. She tutors and lectures in several of the International Development and Global Health subjects offered at the University of Melbourne and RMIT.

Professor Jega Jegatheesan

Jega’s research focuses on integrated water management and recently he has co-edited a book on “Urban Stormwater & Flood Management - Enhancing the Liveability of Cities” published by Springer. Jega is founder and Chairman of the international conference series on Challenges in Environmental Science & Engineering (CESE) held annually since 2008. He has over 300 publications including more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and five edited books. Jega is also the managing guest editor of 30 special issues in peer-reviewed journals, an editorial board member of two Elsevier journals and one prestigious open access journal on membranes. Additionally, he is the editor-in-chief of a book series entitled Applied Environmental Science and Engineering (AESE) for a Sustainable Future published by Springer and has been instrumental for publishing 8 books since 2015.

Meredith Hickman

Meredith Hickman is Head of Strategy at WaterAid Australia. Meredith is a development professional dedicated to the global movement for clean water, decent toilets and good hygiene for everyone, everywhere by 2030. As Head of Strategy at WaterAid, she manages a team of technical experts and business development staff driving the strategic direction of WaterAid’s work in Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Prior to joining WaterAid Meredith supported initiatives around governance, accountability, and decentralisation.  She holds a Master of Internal Development from Sydney University.

Fred Hooper

Fred Hooper is a Murrawarri man from the Murrawarri Nation situated between Bokhara and Warrego Rivers which straddles what is now known as the QLD and NSW boarders in the Western part of NSW and Southwest of QLD. He joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1979 at the age of 17 and served six years on both surface ships and submarines. He left the Navy in 1985 and worked in the Commonwealth Public Service. After leaving the Public Service worked in a number of First Nations organisation. He was responsible for the Murrawarri Nation declaring their continued Independence from the Crown of Great Britain. He is the Chair of the Murrawarri Peoples Council and the Northern Basin Aboriginal Nations who represents 22 Sovereign First Nations of the Northern Murray Darling Basin. He has worked tirelessly over the past 10 years to secure Water Rights for First Nations and their peoples in the Northern Murray Darling Basin.

Accessibility Information

An accessibility/mobility access map is available to download here (please scroll to the end of the webpage). RMIT’s Building 1 can be accessed via the adjacent Building 21. Gender neural bathrooms are available at the venue. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like further information.

SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Tuesday, 27 August 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief:

SDG7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

By Bradley Davison
RMIT University

This year, the UN noted that while there have been some significant improvements in access to energy and energy and efficiency across the globe, "if Sustainable Development Goals 7, 13 and related Goals are to be met, much higher levels of ambition are required with regard to renewable energy." 

Is it enough for SDG7 to call simply for the world to "increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix" (Target 7.2)? Or is more radical ambition and action required, given the scale of the climate crisis? How can the world transition to renewable energy? Please join us for this seminar to discuss the nature of energy transitions in Europe, New Zealand, and Australia.

Panellists

Professor Ron Boschma, Utrecht University

Gabrielle Henry, Director, Industry Engagement and Development, Commercial and Investment Attraction, Energy, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, Victorian Government

Robyn Henderson, Manager, Sectors and Just Transition Unit, Economic Development and Transitions Branch, Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment, New Zealand Government

Discussant: Professor Bjorn Asheim, Lund University

SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

Tuesday, 24 September 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief:

SDG8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

By Associate Professor Sharif As-Saber
RMIT University & GAIN International

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1976) considers ‘inherent dignity of the human person’ as a primary precondition for ‘freedom, justice and peace in the world’ (UNHR, 2019). SDG 8, which aims at ensuring decent work and human dignity in a sustained, inclusive and sustainable manner, reflects this statement. In this regard, decent work refers to multitude of issues such as workplace safety, living wages, right to union, freedom of expression, non-discrimination between genders and races, non-exploitation of workers including children and women and social protection for the family (ILO, 2019). However, the provision of decent work and its contributions to sustainable economic growth and prosperity have long been an issue of debate while it has been proven to be a mammoth task to ensure them globally.

Panellists

Associate Professor Sharif as-Saber

Director, Master of International Business Program, School of Management, RMIT University

Sharif developed the first-ever sustainability-focused postgraduate international business program in Australia. He earned his PhD in international and comparative management from the University of Tasmania. His current research interests include decent work, governance; anti-corruption, black (illegal) international business, geopolitics and health care management. He has published six books, extensively contributed to refereed journals and presented in leading international conferences. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Administration & Governance and has been the recipient of several competitive grants. He is the Honorary International Advisor Bangladesh Garment Manufacturer and Exporter Association (BGMEA).  In 2018, the Government of Victoria appointed him onto the South Asian Communities Ministerial Advisory Council.  In 2016, he was presented with the “Serendib Multicultural Personality of the Year” award for his longstanding contributions to the multicultural community in Australia.

Kyla Raby

National Program Coordinator – Support for Trafficked People Program / Lead – Trafficking, Forced Labour and Forced Marriage, Australian Red Cross

Kyla Raby is the lead for Human Trafficking, Forced Labour and Forced Marriage at the Australian Red Cross and in this role she manages the Support for Trafficked People Program, a service that supports people impacted by modern slavery, including forced labour, funded by the Australian Government. Kyla has over 12 years’ experience working with communities around the world on human rights issues, primarily in relation to migration, protection, gender and inclusion. She has held leadership positions within civil society which have included designing anti-slavery programming with the British Red Cross in the United Kingdom and deploying to Greece in response to mass population movements, as well as with government and start-ups. Kyla holds a Master of Public and International Law from the University of Melbourne and is the founder of a social change incubator program Change Shapers.

Daisy Gardener

Advocacy and Campaigns Manager, Oxfam Australia

Daisy is the Advocacy and Campaigns Manager with Oxfam Australia. Over the past decade she has led labour rights programs in Indonesia, Myanmar and Australia with a focus on policy, advocacy and campaigning in solidarity with workers and unions. She has published widely on women's rights and business accountability. She holds a Masters of International Development from RMIT University.

Professor Bruce Wilson

Director, EU Centre, RMIT University

In his role as Director of the EU Centre, Bruce provides insights to and leads research and debate on EU-Australian relations, encouraging mobility for staff and students, and for building partnerships between Australian universities and organisations and their European counterparts. He leads all of the EU Centre’s major projects. He has had long experience in working with all levels of government on organisational and social change, and is committed to linking researchers and policy makers with city and regional governments in policy formation related to social and economic policy, innovation, lifelong learning and environment. He was a founding Co-Director of Pascal International Observatory.

SDG 9: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Tuesday, 29 October 2019, 12:30pm–2pm
RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief

SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation

By Associate Professor Jerry Courvisanos
Federation University

Panellists

Associate Professor Wendy Steele, Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University 
Associate Professor Jerry Courvisanos, Federation Business School, Federation University 
Professor Bruce Wilson, Director, EU Centre, RMIT University

SDG 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

Tuesday, 26 November 2019, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief:

SDG10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

By Dr Mathew Doidge and Dr Serena Kelly

National Centre for Research on Europe

University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Panellists

Dr Serena Kelly

National Centre for Research on Europe, The University of Canterbury (NZ)

Serena teaches and researches the politics and external relations of the European Union (EU) and is leading a Post-Brexit perceptions project and research aiming to promote a greater understanding of the EU and its policies in New Zealand's political, business, NGO, civil society and media communities (including NZ and EU/EU Member State's diplomatic corps), as well as of EU-NZ relations and NZ policies towards the EU.

Professor Guy Johnson

Urban Housing and Homelessness, RMIT University

Guy leads the Unison Housing Research Program at RMIT University, an industry led partnership that aims to address the ongoing issue of housing insecurity and homelessness in a way that looks at both the existing failings in the housing system and preventative measures to help alleviate disadvantage. Prior to his appointment he was Director of the Centre for Applied Social Research (CASR) at RMIT University.

Professor Bruce Wilson

Director EU Centre of Excellence, RMIT University

Bruce provides insights to and leads research and debate on EU-Australian relations, encouraging mobility for staff and students, and for building partnerships between Australian universities and organisations and their European counterparts. He leads all of the major projects for the EU Centre of Excellence. He has had long experience in working with all levels of government on organisational and social change, and is committed to linking researchers and policy makers with city and regional governments in policy formation related to social and economic policy, innovation, lifelong learning and environment. He was a founding Co-Director of Pascal International Observatory.

SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Tuesday, 25 February 2020, 12:30pm–2pm

RMIT City Campus
Council Chamber, Level 2R, RMIT Building 1
124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne

Policy brief: 

SGD 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

By Campbell Hughes

RMIT University

 

Panellists

Professor Mike Osborne, Centre for Sustainable, Healthy and Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods, University of Glasgow

Professor Jago Dodson, Centre for Urban Research, School of Global Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University

Professor Usha Iyer-Raniga, School of Property and Construction Management, RMIT University

SDG 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Tuesday, 21 April 2020, 12:30pm–2pm

Hosted online by European Union Centre of Excellence at RMIT University

Policy brief

SGD 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

 

Panellists

Professor Nava Subramaniam, Deputy Dean, Research and Innovation, School of Business, RMIT University

Associate Professor Kimberley Humphery, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University

Ms Angela Hoefnagels, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

SDG 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Tuesday, 26 May 2020, 12:30pm–2pm

Hosted online by European Union Centre of Excellence at RMIT University

Policy brief

SDG 13: Coming soon

Panellists

Professor Ralph Horne, Professor of Geography and Deputy Pro-Vice Chancellor, Research and Innovation for the College of Design and Social Context at RMIT University.

Associate Professor Lauren Rickards, Co-leader of the Climate Change and Resilience research program of the Centre for Urban Research and Senior Lecturer in the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT

Krista Milne, Co-Director Climate Change Action Branch Strategy, Planning and Climate Change at City of Melbourne

Michael Anderson, Manager Utilities, Property Services at RMIT University

Early Career and Graduate Workshops

Universities are increasingly focusing their attention on the SDGs. In 2018, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings introduced a new measurement based on the Goals, which aims to rank global universities’ success in delivering on SDG targets. Institutions across the world—including RMIT—are looking to the SDGs as a framework for teaching, research, engagement and impact.

The Jean Monnet SDG Network is pleased to announce a series of workshops for graduate students and early career researchers (broadly defined) aimed at making sense of the emerging place of the SDGs in universities. The first workshop was held in May 2019 at RMIT University (see below for more information and resources).

Further workshops will be held across 2019-2020. To be informed of dates and calls for applications, please subscribe to our mailing list.

The first Graduate and ECR Workshop was held at the RMIT City Campus on Tuesday, 7 May 2019, from 9.30am-2.00pm, with 16 locally based researchers.

The workshop addressed the ‘troubles and opportunities’ with SDG engagement and research, including the following issues:

Context: Institutional and Country

The troubles and opportunities for universities engaging with the SDGs

Methods: Measurement and the SDGs

The troubles and opportunities with a methodological focus on measurement.

Content: The Politics of SDG Research

The troubles and opportunities of engaging with the politics of the SDGs in our research.

For more detail on the day’s activities, please see the following resources:

Workshop 1 Program

Workshop 1 Call for Papers

Workshop 1 Participant Worksheet

Workshop 1 Presentation: “SDGs, Uni’s and Students,” Lauren Rickards and Wendy Steele.

The second Graduate and ECR Workshop was held at the RMIT City Campus on Thursday, 29 August 2019, from 10am-5pm, again with 16 locally based researchers. 

This workshop explored publication opportunities for SDG-aligned research. Using a call for chapters in the forthcoming Springer Encyclopedia of the SDGs, participants were guided through the complex processes of academic publication, including choosing where to submit, preparing an abstract, preparing your article, how to respond to reviewer comments and how peer-review works.

Workshop 2 Information and Program

People

Professor Bruce Wilson

Bruce Wilson is Director of the European Union Centre at RMIT. In this role, he provides insights to and leads research and debate on EU-Australian relations, encouraging mobility for staff and students, and for building partnerships between Australian universities and organisations and their European counterparts. He also leads a major project on comparative regional policy in Europe, Australia and Asia, looking at interventions to promote innovative economic development that improves the living and working conditions of people in metropolitan and rural city-regions. He has had long experience in working with all levels of government on organisational and social change, and is committed to linking researchers and policy makers with city and regional governments in policy formation related to social and economic policy, innovation, lifelong learning and environment. He was a founding Co-Director of Pascal International Observatory.

Dr Emma Shortis

Dr Emma Shortis is a Research Officer at the EU Centre and a member of the Social and Global Studies Centre at RMIT University. Emma recently completed her PhD in History at the University of Melbourne. Emma's research interests include global environmental governance, environmental history and diplomacy, and the relationship between history and climate change adaptation. In 2017-18, Emma was a Fox-Zucker International Fellow at Yale University. Emma holds a Master's Degree in International and European Studies from Monash University, and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Melbourne.

Associate Professor Jose Roberto Guevara

Jose Roberto ‘Robbie’ Guevara is an educator with extensive experience in adult, community and popular education, and participatory action research with a focus on education for sustainable development, environmental education, global citizenship education and development education, within the Asia and South Pacific regions. He is a sought after facilitator for his expertise in participatory, creative and experiential learning methodologies that are grounded in the local context.

He has been inducted into the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame in October 2012 for his contribution to adult learning in the Asia-Pacific region and was awarded a CONFINTEA Research Scholarship by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning to conduct research on education and resilience in 2016.

Current international development projects include the design and conduct of Curriculum globALE (Global Adult Learning and Education Curriculum) for the Ministry of Education and Sports, Lao PDR with the support of the DVV-International (German Adult Education Association). He has completed a long-term project which involved the design, conduct and evaluation of the Programme for Education for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific for the Asia - Pacific Cultural Centre for UNESCO (ACCU) and UNESCO Bangkok (2005 - 2014).

He effectively combines his teaching, research and development practice. One example is the Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage funded project on “Youth-led Learning: Local Connections and Global Citizenship” with Plan International Australia and the Australian Youth Research Centre at the University of Melbourne. This project began as a student internship and resulted in the publication of the edited book entitled “Youth-led Learning for Global Citizenship” published by Melbourne University Press.

Dr Mary Johnson

A Research Fellow at RMIT and chief investigator for a six year, Australian government funded project to improve methods and impacts of agricultural extension in conflict vulnerable areas of Mindanao, Philippines. This project focusses on improving livelihoods for small-holder farmers (including Indigenous People); sustainable agricultural practice; promoting gender equality and the interests of rural communities. Mary has worked extensively in community development, agricultural, natural resource management and education both within Australia and internationally.    

Associate Professor Sharif As-Saber

Associate Professor Sharif As-Saber joined the RMIT University in 2010. Previously, he served at Monash University, the University of Tasmania and Massey University. He earned his PhD in international and comparative management from the University of Tasmania. He holds academic qualifications such as BSocSc (Honours) (International Relations), LL.B, MSocSc (International Relations) and an MBA (International Business). He completed a faculty development program in International Business Law and Ethics at the University of Colorado at Denver. Previously, he held several academic administrative positions including the Founding Director, MPhil (Industry) Program and Director, International Business Program at Monash University; Sub-Dean, International Business Program at the University of Tasmania; and International Business Program Manager at Massey University, New Zealand. He also has a long public service experience.    

Michael Nolan

Michael leads the strategic direction and growth of the UNGC Cities Programme. He has over 20 years of consulting experience in driving sustainability partnerships and outcomes for government, business and civil society.  Previously Michael was the Global Leader for Climate and Resilience for AECOM, Director for Sustainable Change (consultancy) and Strategic Planner for Sustainability at RMIT University. He has extensive experience in sustainable urban development and infrastructure in Asia Pacific, Americas and Europe.

Professor Chris Duke

Chris Duke is an Honorary Professor of Lifelong Learning within the Institute of Education at the University in Scotland, and holds a similar position at the University of Leicester in England. For 2002 to 2003 he was Director of Community and Regional Partnerships at RMIT, serving also for a few months as Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Organisation Behaviour and Change. Chris is currently the Executive Director of Pascal, the International Observatory on Place Management, Social Capital and Learning Regions, and a member of the OECD IMHE Project Team on the role of higher education institutions in regional development, serving as lead evaluator for NE England, Busan in Korea, and the Canaries region of Spain, also as co-author of the final synthesis report.

Professor Martin Holland

Professor Martin Holland is Director of the National Centre for Research on Europe at the University of Canterbury and of the EU Centres Network New Zealand. He has taught at the Canterbury since 1984 and in 2000 established the NCRE, NZ’s only EU tertiary level research centre. He is internationally recognised for his work on EU Development policy, CFSP and Perceptions of the EU. He initiated the “EU External Perceptions Project” which was recognized by DG EAC as one of the top 20 “Jean Monnet Success Stories” and has supervised projects on perceptions of the EU in Asia, Africa and the Pacific. He has held a Jean Monnet Chair ad personam since 2008 and is the author of over one hundred articles and chapters and twenty-five books, the most recent being Development Policy of the EU (with M. Doidge, Palgrave, 2012); Communicating Europe in the Times of Crisis: External Perceptions of the European Union (Ed. with N. Chaban, Palgrave-McMillan, 2014) and Shaping the EU’s Global Strategy: Partners and Perception (Ed. with N. Chaban Palgrave-MacMillan, 2018)

Dr Serena Kelly

Dr Serena Kelly is an early career academic who is equally passionate about teaching and researching the EU. Serena has lectured in 9 courses on the EU since 2008, in collaboration with a number of esteemed academics at UC. She is the author and co-author of a number of academic articles, mentors post-graduate students and regularly travels to Europe and Asia to conduct research and present at conferences, thus keeping up-to-date with the EU.  Dr Kelly’s PhD assessed the potential impact of the EEAS and was well received. Since then, Serena has been involved in a number of projects, most notably perceptions of the EU in 10 ASEM countries. In this project she was coordinator, trainer and mentor for approximately 12 postdoctoral and postgraduate researchers as well as their local supervisors. Her research interests include: European diplomacy, international political communication and Europe’s relations, presence, impact in and, with the Asia Pacific.    

Dr Mathew Doidge

Dr Doidge specialises in the study of the European Union (with a focus on its external relations) and international development. He is a Senior Fellow of the National Centre for Research on Europe, with experience teaching a range of modules on the European Union, and on the politics of international development both at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has taught at Universities in New Zealand, Germany and the United Kingdom, and has authored a number of articles and books addressing the external relations of the EU, including its development policy. His research interests include: EU external relations (with foci on development policy and EU–Asia relations), regionalism, interregionalism, and development. Dr Doidge has recently been funded with an Erasmus+ Jean Module ‘European Union Development Policy in International Context’ module.

Professor Michael Osborne

Michael Osborne is Professor of Adult and Lifelong Learning at the University of Glasgow and Director of Research within the School of Education.

He is experienced in adult and continuing education, Vocational Education and Training (VET) and Higher Education research, development and evaluation. He is also Director of the Centre for Research and Development in Adult and Lifelong Learning (CR&DALL) within the College of Social Sciences, and Co-director of the PASCAL Observatory on Place Management, Social Capital and Lifelong Learning within the School of Education. He has been a co-convenor of the People, Places, Engagement and Change research cluster within the Adam Smith Research Foundation of which he was a Board member. CR&DALL is a constituent part of the Glasgow Centre for International Development, providing its Education component, using in particular its links with Africa in this role. Professor Osborne sits on the university's Africa working group.

He is a Visiting Professor at RMIT Melbourne, a Docent of the University of Tampere and is an External Member of the Artistotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece.

Professor Michele Schweisfurth

Michele is Professor of Comparative and International Education and Director of the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change at the University of Glasgow. She has a wide range of experiences teaching and researching in education institutions in different national contexts (including Sierra Leone, Indonesia, Scotland, the Turks and Caicos Islands, Russia, South Africa, Lesotho, Rwanda, The Gambia, India and China), from primary schools to universities, and in non-formal education. She has particular expertise in comparative methods, in pedagogy, and in the relationship between education and political development.  For further details including current projects, please see https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/education/staff/micheleschweisfurth/.

Professor Jacqueline Lo

Executive Director of ANU Centre for European Studies wining 2 large grants from European Commission to co-fund the Centre and its international and programmes in Asia/Europe/North America since 2011. Highly experienced academic leader. Also holds appointment as Chair of ANU Academic Board, the apex of academic governance. Her research focuses on issues of nationalism, transnationalism, migration, diaspora and the interaction of cultures and communities across ethnic, national and regional borders. Jacqueline has considerable experience in education and cultural policy, cultural diplomacy and research management. She has advised the Australian government on arts, education and multicultural policies for many years. The Founding Chair of the Asian Australian Studies Research Network, she was awarded the Chevalier Ordre des Palmes Académiques in 2014 for building European-French cultural relations. She also holds a number of adjunct and visiting positions in Europe and the USA.

Publications

SDG 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere

By Dr Mathew Doidge and Dr Serena Kelly
National Centre for Research on Europe
University of Canterbury, New Zealand    

SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

By Associate Professor Lauren Rickards
and Dr Emma Shortis
School of Global, Urban and Social Studies
RMIT University

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

By Dr Debbi Long
Senior Lecturer, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies
RMIT University

SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

By Associate Professor Jose Roberto Guevara
RMIT University

SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

By Lavinia Hirsu, Lamiah Hashemi, and Zenaida Quezada-Reyes,
University of Glasgow, University of Kurdistan, Philippine Normal University

SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

By Naomi Francis

Nossal Institute for Global Health and the School of Social and Political Sciences

University of Melbourne

SDG7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

By Bradley Davison
RMIT University

SDG8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

By Associate Professor Sharif As-Saber
RMIT University & GAIN International

SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation

By Associate Professor Jerry Courvisanos
Federation University

SDG10: Reduce inequality within and among countries

By Dr Mathew Doidge and Dr Serena Kelly

SGD 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

By Campbell Hughes
RMIT University

SGD 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

By Campbell Hughes
RMIT University

Wilson, Bruce, Doidge, Mathew, Shortis, Emma and Guevara, Roberto, "Collaborative Approaches to Implementing the United Nations SDG Agenda: A Policy Dialogue" Singapore, 13 June 2019.

Wilson, Bruce, “Introduction to the Jean Monnet Network,” RMIT Global Compact Cities Programme event “Building the SDGs from the Ground Up,” RMIT University, 20 March 2019.

Shortis, Emma, “Introducing the SDGs,” Workshop: Innovating with Purpose for the SDGs, RMIT University Engaging for Impact Conference, 20 February 2019.

Wilson, Bruce, “Keynote Address: Regional Resilience and Wellbeing: The Relevance of the Sustainable Development Goals,” Regional Studies Association Australasia Conference, University of Canterbury, New Zealand., 11-13 February 2019.

As-Saber, Sharif, The ‘Global/Local Black Value Chain’ in the Readymade Garment (RMG) Industry: An Ethics, Legal and Governance Perspective,” South Asia Journal, October 2018, 28-44.

As-Saber, Sharif, Waheduzzaman, Wahed, and Hamid, Mohotaj Binte, Elite capture of local participatory governance,” Policy and Politics, Volume 46, Number 4, October 2018, pp. 645-662(18).

Doidge, Mathew, The Changing Place of Development in EU–Asia Relations,” The European Journal of Development Research, Volume 29, Issue 4 (August 2017), pp 926–941.

Doidge, Mathew Shannon, William, and Holland, Martin, A clash of internationalizations: New Zealand and the Bologna Process,” European Journal of Higher Education, 31 December 2018.

Guevara, Roberto, Osborne, Michael and Wilson, Bruce (eds.), Special Issue: Lifelong learning and sustainable development, Australian Journal of Adult Learning (AJAL), Volume 58, Number 3, November 2018.

Lai S., Holland M. and Kelly S. (2019) The Emperor's new clothes? Perceptions of the EU's strategic partnerships in Asia. Asia Europe Journal 17(3): 341-360.

Mori Junior, Renzo., Fien, J. and Horne, R., “Implementing the UN SDGs in Universities: Challenges, Opportunities, and Lessons Learned,” Sustainability: The Journal of Record, Volume 12(2), 2019, pp.129-133. 

Neary, Joanne and Osborne, Michael, “University engagement in achieving sustainable development goals: A synthesis of case studies from the SUEUAA study,” Special Issue: Lifelong learning and sustainable development, Australian Journal of Adult Learning (AJAL), Volume 58, Number 3, November 2018.

Azizi, N.A., Borkowska, K., Houston, M., Ketuly, KA., Mohammad, S.A., Mwaikokesya, M., Neary, J., Nherera, C., Osborne, M., Reyes, Z. and Swanepoel, E. (2019) The Role of Higher Education for Displaced and Marginalized Peoples – The SUEUAA Project. Project Report. Centre for Research & Development in Adult and Lifelong Learning (CR&DALL), Glasgow. 

Borkowska, K. and Osborne, M.(2018) Locating the fourth helix: rethinking the role of civil society in developing smart learning cities. International Review of Education, 64(3), pp. 355-372.

Osborne, M. and Borkowska, K.(2017) A European lens upon adult and lifelong learning in Asia. Asia Pacific Education Review, 18(2), pp. 269-280.

Schweisfurth, M. and Elliott, J. (2019), When ‘best practice’ meets the pedagogical nexus: recontextualisation, reframing and resilience. Comparative Education, 55(1), pp. 1-8.

Carney, S. and Schweisfurth, M. (Eds.) (2018) Equity In and Through Education: Changing Contexts, Consequences and Contestations. Series: Comparative and international education (Sense Publishers). Koninklije Brill NV: Leiden.

Schweisfurth, M. , Davies, L., Pe Symaco, L. and Valiente, O. (2018) Higher education, bridging capital, and developmental leadership in the Philippines: Learning to be a crossover reformer. International Journal of Educational Development, 59, pp. 1-8.

Moskal, M. and Schweisfurth, M. (2018) Learning, using and exchanging global competence in the context of international postgraduate mobility. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 16(1), pp. 93-105.

Spiel, C., Schwartzman, S., Busemeyer, M., Cloete, N., Drori, G., Lassnigg, L., Schober, B., Schweisfurth, M. and Verma, S.(2018) The contribution of education to social progress. In: International Panel on Social Progress, (ed.)Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel for Social Progress. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, pp. 753-778. 

Mascitelli, Bruno and Wilson, Bruce, So Distant, So Close: Australia and the European Union in the 21st Century (Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2018). 

SDGs news

Disclaimer

The European Commission's support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents, which reflect the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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