Lisa Farrell

Professor Lisa Farrell

Professor of Economics, Director of the Societal Economics Research Group (SERG)

Outside of SAB building. Building is decorated with angled panels reflecting shadows on the wall. Wall colours vary between black, blue, white and light red colours.

Lisa is passionate about the application of economics to enhance societal wellbeing.

Overview

Lisa’s research field is on the general area of applied microeconomics. Her work has a strong focus on aspects of behaviour that involve the consumption of risky products, in particular, gambling, smoking and alcohol consumption. Her work has spanned both the theoretical and micro-econometric aspects social and economic inclusion and the academic impact of this work is clear from the important contributions she has made leading to publications in high quality international journals. Lisa endeavours to communicate her findings to the broadest audience possible and her work has been published in leading economics, statistical and public health journals. These include the American Economic Review, The Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A, and Social science and Medicine, among others. Her work has a strong welfare and wellbeing focus, helping to strengthen social and economic inclusion through clear policy recommendations.

Her expertise within the field of the economics of gambling and policy has led Lisa to act as a consultant to both the UK and Victoria governments on aspects related to problem gambling and gambling legislation.

Lisa actively embraces opportunities to work in partnership with key stakeholders and external organisations. She also aims to disseminate her research findings to policy makers and so have impact through policy channels. She sees this as an effective way to allow her research to better the lives of those affected by social and economic exclusion and so improve the wellbeing and sustainability of our communities and societies.

Throughout her career Lisa has shown a strong commitment to policy work in numerous reports and bulletins that she has prepared for government as well as giving government briefing seminars summarising her research findings. Early in her career she worked on secondment as an Economist in The Department for Culture Media and Sport, UK Government gaining valuable first-hand experience of government policy making processes. She has also acted as a consultant and expert adviser for the Victorian State Government in Australia and as an expert adviser to the UK National Lottery Commission. This reflects her ability to mesh publication quality research with the policy dimension.

In summary, through her highly developed economic and statistical tool kit Lisa has influenced academic thought and scholarship in regard to economic and social inclusion/exclusion and the impact on society of such poor life outcomes. Her work has reached the widest academic community through Lisa’s publication strategy. Further, she has been active in policy circles, both within Australia and internationally. Lisa sees economic and social policy as an important instrument through which society is protected from harm and through which healthy, sustainable communities can be created. Strong economic and social inclusion can only occur when those engaged in research actively engage with service provides, other stakeholders and policy makers.

Professor Lisa Farrell | RMIT University

Professor Farrell is a Professor in the School of Economics, Finance and Marketing and Director of the Markets, Culture and Behaviour research priority area. She holds a PhD in Economics. Ph.D. Economics, Keele University. Professor Farrell’s field of research is applied microeconomics. Her main area of expertise is in the fields of behavioural and health economics and, in particular, the consumption of risky (addictive) products. She is also an Editorial Board Member for the Journal of Gambling Business and Economics.Research Interests.

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Industry experience

Throughout her career Lisa has shown a strong commitment to policy relevant research. She has been involved in policy related projects with The Victorian Department of Justice, the Australian Productivity Commission, the UK’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport, the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), and the Irish Universities Association. This indicates the transformative impact of her work and the deep connections she has with external stakeholders in her field of research demonstrating the impact of her research beyond traditional academic outputs. A project in partnership with VicHealth was the RMIT FOR15 Impact Case Study for ERA 2018 which was awarded a ‘Medium’ ranking overall with a ‘high’ ranking for engagement.

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Research

Lisa's research interests lie in Applied Microeconomics, with a particular focus on important contemporary social policy issues such as decision making under risk and uncertainty, and health behaviours. Much of her published research to date has focused on the microeconomic modelling of individual behaviour, utilising a discrete choice modelling framework and panel data techniques. Topics she has worked on include Consumer Behaviour, Health Behaviours and Behavioural Economics/ Economic Psychology.

Research keywords

Subjective Wellbeing, Health Economics, Economic Psychology, Societal Economics, Economics of Gambling, Economics of Lifestyle Choices and Risky Behaviours

Research output summary

90

Publications

$940,000

Projects

4

Awards

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Supervisor interest areas

  • Health economics
  • Subjective wellbeing
  • Consumption patterns and behaviours
  • Lifestyle choices

Supervisor projects

Lisa is an effective Higher Degree by Research supervisor and has supervised many Honours students. She has also supervised 5 PhD students to completion. She encourages her students to obtain scholarships and win awards. For example, Katie Belle (Honours University of Melbourne) won the Meredith Edwards Award from the Australian Economics Society in 2003. This is a national award given to the best essay from a female student. Claire Finn (PhD UCD) won an Endeavor Award from the Australian Department for Education, Science and Training and Eibhlin Hubson, (PhD UCD) won a national Irish Humanities and Social Science Research Council scholarship.

Current students are working in the field of:

  • Pollution and health outcomes
  • Energy economics
  • Cultural, Social and Political Effects of International Migration
  • Economics and health outcomes of refugees
  • The economic and social effects of weather shocks on households

Feature publications

Can expected utility theory explain gambling?

American Economic Review 92 (3), 613-624

R Hartley, L Farrell (2002).

Neighbourhood ethnic diversity and mental health in Australia

Health Economics 28 (9), 1075-1087

S Awaworyi Churchill, L Farrell, R Smyth (2019).

The socioeconomic gradient in physical inactivity: evidence from one million adults in England

Social science & medicine 123, 55-63

L Farrell, B Hollingsworth, C Propper, MA Shields (2014).

Key publications by year

Publications

  • L. Farrell, JM Fry, TRL Fry (2021).Gender differences in hammer prices for Australian Indigenous art. Journal of Cultural Economics, 45 (1), 1-12.
  • L. Farrell, J.M. Fry and T.R.L. Fry (2021) Who Trusts the Bank of England and High Street Banks in Britain? Applied Economics, 53(16), 1886-1898.
  • L. Farrell, & J. M. Fry (2021). Australia's gambling epidemic and energy poverty. Energy Economics, 97, 105218.

Publications

  • S Awaworyi Churchill, L Farrell, R Smyth (2019) Neighbourhood ethnic diversity and mental health in Australia. Health Economics 28 (9), 1075-1087.
  • SA Churchill, R Smyth, L Farrell (2020) Fuel poverty and subjective wellbeing. Energy Economics 86, 104650.
  • SA Churchill, L Farrell (2020) Australia’s Gambling Epidemic: The Role of Neighbourhood Ethnic Diversity. Journal of Gambling Studies 36 (1), 97-118.
  • S, Awaworyi Churchill, & L. Farrell (2020). Social capital and gambling: evidence from Australia. Journal of Gambling Studies, 36, 1161-1181.

 

Short papers, notes, and comments

  • ‘Are there lessons from gambling control for tobacco control?’ L. Farrell (2020) Addiction 115 (5), 811-812.

 

Edited books

  • 'Measuring, Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People', SA Churchill, L Farrell, S Appau, Springer Singapore, 2020.

 

Book chapters

  • SA Churchill, L Farrell, (2020) ‘Sexual Orientation and Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs)’ in Moving from the Millennium to the Sustainable Development Goals, 95-118.
  • SA Churchill, L Farrell, VB Marisetty (2020) ‘Mobile Money and Women’s Decision-Making Power in India’ in Moving from the Millennium to the Sustainable Development Goals, 61-76.
  • S Appau, SA Churchill, L Farrell (2020) ‘Wellbeing Among Older People: An Introduction’ in Measuring, Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People, 1-13.
  • S Appau, SA Churchill, L Farrell (2020) ‘Employment Types and Subjective Wellbeing: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing’ in Measuring, Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People, 117- 147.
  • M Elkins, L Farrell, J Fry (2020) ‘Investigating the Relationship Between Housing Insecurity and Wellbeing’ in Measuring, Understanding and Improving Wellbeing Among Older People, 41-73.

Publications

  • Appau, S. Awaworyi Churchill, S. and Farrell, L. (2019) Social integration and subjective wellbeing. Applied Economics, pp. 1-14.
  • SA Churchill, L Farrell (2019) Social Capital and Gambling: Evidence from Australia
  • Journal of Gambling Studies, 1-21.
  • SA Churchill, S Appau, L Farrell (2019) Religiosity, income, and wellbeing in developing countries. Empirical Economics 56 (3), 959-985.
  • S Awaworyi Churchill, L Farrell, R Smyth (2019) Neighbourhood ethnic diversity and mental health in Australia. Health Economics 28 (9), 1075-1087.

Publications

  • Appau, S., Churchill, S.A. and Farrell, L. (2018) Religiosity, Income and Wellbeing in Developing Countries’ Empirical Economics, Springer, Germany, pp. 1-27.
  • Farrell, L. (2018) ‘Understanding the relationship between subjective wellbeing and gambling behavior’ Journal of Gambling Studies vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 55-71.
  • Risse, L. Farrell, L. and Fry, T. (2018) Personality and pay: do gender gaps in confidence explain gender gaps in wages? Oxford Economic Papers vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 919-949.
  • Farrell, L. Fry, J. and Fry, T. (2018) Determinants of sales and price at auction for three Australian Indigenous artists: to pool or not to pool? Journal of Cultural Economics, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 507-520.
  • Awaworyi Churchill, S. and Farrell, L. (2018) The impact of gambling on depression: new evidence from England and Scotland. Economic Modelling, vol. 68, pp. 475-483.

Publications

  • Farrell, L. and Fry, T.R.L. (2017) ‘Pre-sale information and auction prices for Australian Indigenous Artworks’ Revision for Scottish Journal of Political Economy vol. 64, no. 5, pp. 483-500.
  • Churchill, S.A. and Farrell, L. (2017) Alcohol and depression: Evidence from the 2014 Health Survey for England. Drug and Alcohol Dependence Volume 180, pp86-92.
  • Churchill, S.A. and Farrell, L. (2017) ‘Gambling and Depression: New evidence from England and Scotland’ Economic Modelling. Volume 68, pp. 475-483.
  • Churchill, S.A. and Farrell, L. (2017) ‘Investigating the relationship between smoking and subjective welfare’ Revision for Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics vol. 71, pp. 1-12.

Publications

  • Farrell, L., Fry, R.L. and Risse, L. (2016) ‘The significance of financial self-efficacy in explaining women’s personal financial behaviour’ Journal of Economic Psychology, Volume 54, pp 85–99.

Publications

  • Farrell, L., Hollingsworth, B., Propper, C. and Shields, M. (2014) ‘The socioeconomic gradient in physical activity: Evidence from one million adults in England’ Social Science and Medicine, Volume. 123, pp55-63.

Publications

  • Farrell, L., and Fry, T.R.L. (2013) ‘Is illicit tobacco demand sensitive to relative price?’ Economic Papers: A journal of applied economics and policy, Volume 32(1), pp. 1-9.

 

Book chapters
  • Farrell, L., & Forrest, D. (2013). Measuring displacement effects across gaming products: a study of Australian gambling markets. In Economics of Betting Markets, Routledge, pp. 56-65.

Publications

  • Farrell, L. (2012) ‘Chasing Data: Sources of Data for the Study of Gambling Economics.’ Australian Economic Review Volume 45(4), pp. 488-496.

Publications

  • Farrell, L., Fry, T.R.L., Harris, M. (2011) ‘A pack a day for twenty years: smoking and cigarette pack sizes.’ Applied Economics, Volume 43 (21), pp. 2833-2842.
  • Brown, S., Farrell, L. and Harris, M. (2011) ‘Modelling the Incidence of Self- Employment: Individual and Employment Type Heterogeneity.’ Contemporary Economic Policy, Volume 29 (4), pp. 605–619.

Publications

  • Aitken, C.K., Fry, T.R.L., Farrell, L. and Pellegrini, B. (2009) ‘Smokers of illicit tobacco report significantly worse health than other smokers.’ Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Volume 11(8), pp. 996-1001.

Publications

  • Farrell, L. and Frijters, P. (2008) ‘Choosing to become a ‘lost cause’: the perverse effects of benefit preconditions’ Oxford Economic Papers. Volume 60 (1), pp. 1-19.
  • Farrell, L. and Forrest, D. K. (2008) ‘Measuring Displacement Effects across Gaming Products: A Study of Australian Gambling Markets.’ Applied Economics, Volume 40(1), pp. 53-62.
  • Davidson, S., Farrell, L., Fry, T. and Mihajilo, S. (2008) ‘Contestability of Australian Federal Elections.’ Australian Journal of Political Science. Volume 43(3) pp. 547- 554.

 

Short papers, notes, and comments

  • ‘Comments on Gambling Policy in the European Union: Too many losers?’ By D. Forest, Comments by L. Farrell in Finanz Archive Public Finance Analysis (2008) Volume 64 (4).

 

Book chapters

  • Farrell, L. (2008) ‘When Welfare Economics and Gambling Studies Collide.’ in ‘Gaming in new the competitive environment’ edited by M. Viren, Palgrave/Macmillan.

Publications

  • Farrell L. and Shields, M.A. (2007) ‘Children as consumers: investigating child diary expenditure data.’ Canadian Journal of Economics, Volume 40 (2), pp. 445–467.

Publications

  • Brown, S., Farrell, L, and Sessions, J.G. (2006) ‘Employment Contract Matching: An Analysis of Dual Earner Couples and Working Households.’ Small Business Economics. Volume 26, pp. 155-172.

Book chapters

  • Creigh-Tyte, S. and Farrell, L. (2003) ‘Is the UK National Lottery experiencing lottery fatigue?’ in “The Economics of Gambling” edited by Vaughan-Williams, L. Routledge, pp. 165-182.

Publications

  • Hartley, R. and Farrell, L (2002) ‘Can Friedman-Savage Utility Functions Explain Gambling?’ American Economic Review, Volume 92 (3) pp. 613-624.
  • Farrell, L and Shields, M.A. (2002) ‘Investigating the Economic and Demographic Determinants of Sporting Participation in England.’ The Journal of the Royal Statistic Society of Series A, Volume 165 (2) pp. 335-348.

Publications

  • Farrell, L., Hartley, R., Lanot, G. and Walker, I. (2000) ‘The Demand for Lotto: The Role of Conscious Selection’. Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Volume 18, pp. 228-241.

Publications

  • Farrell, L. and Walker, I. (1999) ‘The Welfare Effects of Lotto: Evidence from the UK.’ Journal of Public Economics, Volume 72, pp. 99-120.
  • Farrell, L., Morgenroth, E. and Walker, I. (1999) ‘A Time Series Analysis of UK lottery Sales: The Long Run Price Elasticity.’ Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Volume 61, pp. 513-526.

Short papers, notes, and comments

  • 'The development of the UK National Lottery: 1992-96- The Statistics of the National Lottery- Discussion’ by L. Farrell and I. Walker in The Journal of the Royal Statistical Society of Series A, (1997), Volume 160 (2), p 222.
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Feature projects

Gambling in the COVID-19 Society

L. Farrell and S. Awaworyi Churchill

Drinking-related lifestyles: exploring the role of alcohol in Victorians' lives 

Reid, M., Farrell, L., Farrelly, F. and Fry, T.R.L.

Key projects

  • Energy poverty and wellbeing with S. Awaworyi Churchill
  • Economic aspects of longevity with J. Fry
  • Consumption of risky products (alcohol and tobacco) with S. Awaworyi Churchill
  • Economics of Indigenous Art Markets with T.R.L. Fry and J. Fry
  • Innovative Practices for Supporting and Promoting Academic Staff Wellbeing in the Higher Education Sector with A Dobele
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Awards

Economic Papers Best paper Award

Farrell, L., and Fry, T.R.L. (2013) ‘Is illicit tobacco demand sensitive to relative price?’ Economic Papers: A journal of applied economics and policy, Volume 32(1), pp. 1-9.

Recipients: Lisa Farrell

Key awards by year

  • Special Issue Editor for the Economic Record Conference of Economists Special Issue July 2020
  • Editorial Board Member for the Economic Record, 2018 onwards
  • Editorial Board Member for the Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, 2007 onwards
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Grants

  • "An investigation of illicit tobacco use its prevalence, economic impact and the motivations and perceptions of consumers" (2004)
    Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Grant (Econometrics) of AU$165,000, with Aitken, C., and Fry, T.R.L.
  • “Economic Reform and Australian Electoral Decision Making” (2003)
    Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Grant (Econometrics) of AU$150,000 with Davidson, S and Fry, T.R.L.
  •  “Drinking-related lifestyles: Development and implementation of lifestyle segmentation model for binge drinking intervention through improved media and message targeting” (2009)
    VicHealth Innovation Grant $198,000 with Reid, M., Farrell, L., Farrelly, F. and Fry, T.R.L.
  • “What women want: unraveling the factors underlying women's financial decision- making behaviour” (2009)
    Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Grant (Economics) of $220,000 with Russell, R., Di Iorio, A., and Fry, T.R.L.
  • “Is there a deficit of consumer trust in the financial sector? If so, what concrete measures can be implemented to remedy this?” (2017)
    Australian Centre of Financial Studies Research Grant $10,000
  • “Women in Economics Network: Australian Gender Economics Workshop 2019” (2018)
    The Victorian Women's Benevolent Trust $4000 with Risse, L and Neelin, A.
  • “Are Women Better Empowered with Technological Innovations? Understanding the Role of Fintech in Women Financial Empowerment and Wellbeing” (2019)
    Scheme for Promotion of Academic Research Collaboration (SPARC), India Award.
    Award team V.B. Marisetty, J.S. Prasad, L. Farrell and S. Awaworyi Churchill.
    Australian component $91,000 with S. Awaworyi Churchill International Primary Investigators.
  • “Economic insecurity and gambling behaviours in Victoria in the COVID-19 society” (2021)
    Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation (Round 11 grant) $127,085 with S. Awaworyi Churchill
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Public and media engagements

2021

  • How to tell if you're addicted to sports bet apps
    ABC News - 20/09/2021
    Bored at home during Melbourne's long lockdown in 2020, Tom* got into sports betting. "There was sport on every weekend, which gave us something to watch," the 26-year-old construction worker says.

 

  • Gambling addictions on the rise
    702 ABC Sydney - 20/09/2021
    Lisa Farrell Speaks to 702 ABC Sydney about gambling addictions, touching on how gambling has increased and become a more normalised activity today due to accessibility, exposure, and a stronger perception of the interlink between sports and gambling in today’s generation.

 

  • Gambling problems connected to sports media
    Triple J Radio - 28/09/2021
    Lisa Farrell talks to Triple J radio about her research into gambling and how her findings have come to discover the interception of betting into sports via the media, hence the development of gambling problems seen in younger people.
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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.