Capstone project helps develop keyless car access

All RMIT undergraduate engineering students complete a year-long engineering capstone project in their final year to work on a real-life design project.

Double degree student in Telecommunications Engineering and Physics, Michael Palatsides, worked together with Bosch Australia on a Capstone project related to keyless car access.

Using car keys may become a thing of the past, as Bosch have developed the Perfectly Keyless system to access and start your car with your mobile phone.

Over the past few years, RMIT engineering students have been working with Bosch on this project as part of their Capstone course, looking to improve and enhance different elements of the system.

Michael has produced a statistical localisation approach to calculate the position of a phone in relation to a vehicle, and to reduce the amount of vehicle mounted sensors required to achieve this. 

“Based on only received signal strength values, my primary task has been to determine if the phone is located inside or outside the car,” says Michael. 

Such knowledge is important for enabling functions such as unlocking and starting the vehicle, depending where the user’s phone is located. 

Industry partner Bosch is very satisfied with the results of our Capstone research and intends to implement the technology in the future.

“Working with RMIT Capstone students has been a great way to continue Research & Development (R&D) on new and interesting topics while staying relevant to industry needs,” says Andrew Thompson, Design Engineer at Robert Bosch Australia. 

“The research builds on expert knowledge and brings fresh approaches to solve problems. Every project plays a role in advancing future products.”   

Working on this project has sparked an interest in Michael to continue in research.

“My career goal is to perform project and R&D work,” says Michael. “I love tackling all kinds of problems and working with the available resources to come up with a solution.”

Michael Palatsides,  RMIT double degree student in Telecommunications Engineering and Physics Michael Palatsides, RMIT double degree student in Telecommunications Engineering and Physics
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aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.