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School of Engineering news

Electronic chip mimics the brain to make memories in a flash

Engineers have mimicked the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories.

Imaging tech advances chronic wound care

Researchers are working with not-for-profit health and aged care provider Bolton Clarke on a clinical trial of imaging technology to improve chronic wound care.

3D-printed spine disc ‘has given me my whole world back’

An industry collaboration between surgeons and engineers has been recognised for its life-changing impact.

Kate among engineering industry’s best and brightest

Biomedical engineer Associate Professor Kate Fox has been named on Engineers Australia’s prestigious top 30 most innovative engineers list.

Industry applauds RMIT’s electronic engineering innovation

PhD candidate Shruti Nirantar has been named one of Australia’s top 30 most innovative engineers by Engineers Australia.

Life beyond the lab: three reasons to choose STEM

With science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) skills in growing demand, today’s graduates are enjoying a growing choice of careers across a range of industries.

Uber in the air: flying taxi trials may lead to passenger service by 2023

Uber Air will start test flights of its aerial taxi service in 2020, and move to commercial operations by 2023, the ABC reported today.

Making defence research partnerships work

Becoming an industry partner of choice requires several key ingredients, writes RMIT aerospace and defence research centre director Professor Michelle Gee.

Building next gen smart materials with the power of sound

Researchers have used sound waves to precisely manipulate atoms and molecules, accelerating the sustainable production of breakthrough smart materials.

RMIT 3D printing research wins peak manufacturing industry award

Industry-led research to 3D print steel tools has won the Endeavour Award for best technology application.

3D printing solutions for industry

Industry-led research at RMIT’s 3D printing facility is being recognised for giving students, staff and businesses the edge in a competitive landscape.

Device simplifies study of blood cells, opens new organ-on-chip possibilities.

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body.

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nations on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

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