Electrical and biomedical engineering

Electrical and Biomedical Engineering is a diverse discipline where students learn about modern technology from power systems to medical devices.

In the Electrical and Biomedical Engineering discipline, we teach a wide range of courses including Computer and Network Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Electrical Engineering.

We teach the latest advances in: 

  • generation, distribution, utilisation, and control of electric power and electronic systems

  • assistive technology and advanced medical electronics, implant engineering, biomedical signal analysis, and tissue engineering

  • Internet of Things (IoT) platforms, sensor networks, high-performance parallel processing, real-time embedded hardware control and data communication networks.

Our programs are industry-connected and hands-on. All engineering students will undertake a capstone project in their final year, solving a real-world problem.  

We work together with many industry partners on projects, internships and program feedback such as Solve Disability Solutions, St Vincent's Hospital, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, OMX Solutions, Bionics Institute, Robert Bosch Pty Ltd., AusNet Services, Powercor and Jemena.

Our graduates find exciting careers across a range of industries such as hospitals (servicing and optimising equipment), medical device manufacturing, defence, research and development, electricity supply and energy companies, transport, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

— Professor Elena Pirogova

Associate Dean Electrical and Biomedical Engineering

What is electrical, biomedical and computer and network engineering?

Student looking in microscope

Electrical engineers develop technology that exploits electrical energy. This includes the production and distribution of electricity, through to the control and automation of electrical machines and systems. Electrical engineers design and operate electrical systems to provide better and innovative ways to meet the power demands of society and industry.

Biomedical engineers develop technology and solutions to help make a difference to people suffering from a medical condition. They design systems and devices such as cardiac monitors, artificial hearts, lab-on-a-chip devices and wheelchairs. 

Computer and network engineers design and integrate embedded systems, core enterprise networks and computing platforms which form the basis of our modern digital lives. Engineers in this area use both hardware and software development skills to bring products to life and drive new technologies to make businesses more productive and competitive.

Our courses

Undertake one of our degrees and make a real difference as an engineer.

 

Research

Electrical and biomedical engineering is a diverse discipline with research varying from high voltage distribution networks to microfluidic devices for analysis of biological cells, and radar systems for autonomous navigation.

Beyond the classroom

Meet our people

Student looking through microscope in a lab

Surface Mount Device Laboratory (SMD)

The SMD Laboratory is a newly developed facility where students can produce functional electronic and embedded-system prototypes. Towards the end of their program, students can use industry-relevant instruments and techniques and realise small volume prototype runs for both student and research projects. The laboratory houses a Pick and Place machine, seven-stage reflow oven, dedicated precision assembly workspaces, test and measurement tools as well as high-resolution optical inspection.

News

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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business. - Artwork created by Louisa Bloomer

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.