People

Below is a list of key people in the Integrated Photonics and Applications Centre (InPAC)

Centre Director

Distinguished Professor Arnan Mitchell - InPAC Director

Arnan is responsible for the overall strategy of the Centre and is the initial contact for new collaborations with academics, industry and government.

Media and Communications

Rachael Vorwerk - Science Communicator

Rachael is a science communicator and raises the profile of the Centre, whilst working with the team to make their research accessible to broader audiences such as the public, media, grant funders and industry.

Data Communications team

Dr Bill Corcoran - Team Leader

Bill is a researcher in optical communications, focusing on using novel photonic technologies to fix problems in the systems that provide the backbone of the internet.

Park (Chawaphon) Prayoonyong

Chawaphon (Park) is investigating how optical frequency combs can support data communication systems, to reduce costs and the load on current internet infrastructure.

Yonghang Sun

Precision Sensing and Defence team

Dr Andy Boes

Andy is using the photonic integrated circuits for precision sensing and defence applications, such as inertial positioning sensors. These photonic integrated circuits are created by the simulation and fabrication teams.

Dr Armandas Balčytis​

Armandas is working on interfacing and packaging the microscale integrated photonic circuits for real-world applications, like enhancing the precision of drones used for remote survey of land and infrastructure.

Marina Raevskaia

Rebecca Taube

Rebecca is researching how to integrate optical gyroscopes onto a fingernail-sized chip so they are more suitable from a cost and performance perspective in driverless cars.

Luke Broadley

Luke is working on signal processing techniques to improve the accuracy, size, and cost of optical sensors needed in assessing biological samples, monitoring the structural health of buildings and bridges, and defence applications.

Paramjeet Kaur

Paramjeet is creating a photonic integrated photodetector that will make sensors more accurate, compact and cost-effective to be used in driverless cars, infrastructure monitoring and drones.

Simulation and Design team

Dr Thach Nguyen

Thach is responsible for coordinating the Centre's simulation and design efforts and investigates new theoretical concepts for photonics integrated circuits.

Aditya Vashi

Aditya is automating a laboratory setup to help photonics researchers to check the behaviour of their optical chips with higher accuracy and precision, all in less time.

Tasneem Akther

Tasneem is researching more efficient, accessible and less invasive scanning methods using on-chip optical filters that could be used to more accurately read glucose levels or the allergic components of food.

Haijin Huang

Haijin is researching how to use more efficient techniques like optical frequency microcombs, to send data faster and more efficiently through existing networks for faster internet speeds.

Phuong Tang

Phuong is investigating how to develop more compact ways to implement a new type of filter, which is an essential component for a variety of applications including sensing and data communications.

Panteha Pedram

Panteha is developing new 2D materials to identify their nonlinear optical properties, to integrate them onto chip-based devices to increase data flow across the internet.

Kokou Firmin Fiaboe

Kokou designs, fabricates and integrates broadband sources into photonic chips using a lithium niobate platform for environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis and military applications.

Technology and Fabrication team

Dr Guanghui Ren

Guanghui looks after InPAC’s current fabrication platforms and establishes new technologies for application teams and end-users, whist ensuring all InPAC’s photonic integrated circuits perform the way the design team intended.

Tanveer Mahmud

Tanveer is developing advanced technologies to create three-dimensional polymer structures on integrated photonic platforms for telecommunication and biochemical sensing applications.

Dr Nitu Syed

Nitu is working on developing a photonic integrated circuit platform made of silicon nitride to reduce the optical efficiency losses in the red, green, blue wavelengths.

Aditya Dubey

Aditya’s research combines functional optical materials with novel two-dimensional materials to create for more compact, sensitive and accurate applications in defence, data communications, and biotechnology.

Mohab Abdalla

Mohab is investigating neuromorphic computing architectures using integrated photonics, aiming towards energy-efficient hardware with faster computational speeds for ever-demanding deep learning applications.

Marko Perestjuk

Marko is working on trapping mid-infrared light to develop a tiny fingernail-sized photonic chip to make sensors more compact for detecting diseases in our breath, or the quality of the air in our environment.

Jackson Jacob Chakkoria

Jack is researching wavelength converters that have the potential to meet future high-speed communication needs while minimising energy consumption, cost, and size with the photonic integrated circuit platform.

Sonya Palmer

Sonya is looking at how integrated photonic circuits can be used to miniaturise precision measurement tools like quantum sensors for use in satellites in deep space exploration and more accurate mining.

Biomedical Applications team

Dr Cesar S. Huertas

Cesar combines photonic biosensors with microfluidic devices to give us more accurate insight into human biology and disease states for more personalised treatments in the future.

Dr Crispin Szydzik

Crispin is creating new microfluidics approaches to more accurately filter, sample and sense small amounts of liquid such as blood and saliva for more precise and personalised medical devices.

Dr Francisco Lopez

Francisco investigates how to use microfluidics and micromechanics to ensure all components can be integrated seamlessly to allow for more precise biomedical fluid handling, personalised care devices and sensitive sensors.

Dr Rebecca Soffe

Siew Joo Beh

Siew is using photonic biosensors to create a handheld, compact device that will revolutionise how heart attacks are currently diagnosed.

Jorge Lozano Lopez

Jorge is working with optical sensors based on nano-structures and is researching how to improve the sensitivity of sensors by applying signal processing techniques to ensure everyone has access to high-care healthcare.

Madhuri Edla

Madhuri is researching simpler, faster and more accurate fabrication methods so larger numbers of samples can be analysed at the same time.

Syed Harris Hussain

Harris is working on developing an integrated optical-microfluidic biosensing device for real-time analysis of biomarkers from cancer cells that are circulating in the blood.

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Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

aboriginal flag
torres strait flag

Acknowledgement of Country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.