Jakeria Mohd. Rafiuddin

I received my bachelor’s degree in Materials & Metallurgical Engineering from Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology (BUET), Bangladesh in 2012 and master’s by research in Engineering Materials from University of Malaya, Malaysia in 2015.

I started my PhD at RMIT University in March 2019. My PhD project is focused on Corrosion inhibition of aluminium 6000 series alloys by organic inhibitors. This project will try to investigate the long-term durability of inhibitor film and corrosion inhibition mechanism of organic inhibitors by film-forming mechanism.

Presently, I am working on long term stability of a single organic inhibitor film over some alloys of aluminium 6000 series by electrochemical analysis techniques. I will investigate the film-forming behaviour of different organic inhibitors by surface analysis techniques to reveal the exact mechanism of absorption. The outcome of my project will provide some inputs on the existing knowledge gaps on absorption of inhibitor film over aluminium 6000 series alloys. The influence of alloy microstructure on inhibitor film formation is another important aspect of this project. The knowledge of my project can be useful to promote aluminium 6000 alloy series as a better corrosion-resistant material for future automobile industry.

Skills

  • Electrochemical analysis (EIS- Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy)
  • Surface Analysis (FIB SEM -Focus Ion Beam scanning electron microscopy)
  • Materials characterization (FTIR- Furrier transformed infrared spectroscopy)

PhD Project

Topic: Corrosion inhibition studies of aluminium alloys 6XXX series and mechanisms of film formation

Aluminium 6000 series are getting more attention nowadays in automotive applications like extruded car parts, body panels and closures due to their high strength to weight ratio, formability and corrosion resistance. However, severe environmental conditions like sea water, excessive moisture or wet weather could deteriorate the corrosion resistance of AA6XXX in the form of pitting, filiform or intergranular corrosion. It is well-established that organic corrosion inhibitors could delay the corrosion process by forming a protective barrier film. However, the mechanism of absorption of an organic inhibitor film is not well understood for AA6XXX. This study is designed to investigate “in-situ” corrosion inhibition mechanisms, particularly long-term durability and film-forming behaviour, of a selection of organic corrosion inhibitors for AA6XXX series alloys. Adopted methodologies will include open circuit potential (OCP), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic scans (PDS) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) and surface analysis techniques, such as XPS, FIB-SEM, EDS, SKPFM & FTIR.

 Figure 1: Potentiodynamic polarization curves of aluminium 6022 alloy with and without corrosion inhibitor in 0.1M NaCl solution Figure 1: Potentiodynamic polarization curves of aluminium 6022 alloy with and without corrosion inhibitor in 0.1M NaCl solution
Figure 2: Scanning electron microscope image of as received alloy surface of AA6022. Figure 2: Scanning electron microscope image of as received alloy surface of AA6022.
Figure 3: Cross sectional view of milled cross section of aluminium 6022 sample by focus ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) Figure 3: Cross sectional view of milled cross section of aluminium 6022 sample by focus ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM)
Figure 4: Energy dispersive spectra of as received aluminium 6022 alloy surface Figure 4: Energy dispersive spectra of as received aluminium 6022 alloy surface

Prior Work

  • I have worked as a research assistant in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Malaysia under a research project titled as “Compositional Instability of Palm Biodiesel upon exposure to automotive materials” from January 2013 to July 2014.
  • I worked on a project during my final year of bachelor’s in engineering titled as “Mechanical strength of Zn-Al-Si composite”.

Further Information

  • Primary supervisor: Dr. Liam Ward
  • Associate Supervisor: Professor Ivan Cole

Publications

  • JAKERIA, M.R., FAZAL & M., HASEEB, 2014, ‘Influence of different factors on the stability of biodiesel: A review’, Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, V. 30, pp. 154-163.
  • FAZAL, M. A., JAKERIA, M. R. & HASEEB, A. S. M. A, 2014, ‘Effect of copper and mild steel on the stability of palm biodiesel properties: A comparative study’, Industrial Crops and Products, V. 58, pp. 8-14.
  • JAKERIA, M.R., FAZAL & M., HASEEB, 2015, ‘Effect of corrosion inhibitors on corrosiveness of palm biodiesel’, Corrosion Engineering, Science Technology, V. 50, pp 56-62.
  • FAZAL, M., JAKERIA, M.R., HASEEB, A. & RUBAIEE, 2017, ‘Effect of antioxidants on the stability and corrosiveness of palm biodiesel upon exposure of different metals’, Energy, V. 135, pp. 220-226.
  • Jakeria, M.R., I Cole & L Ward. ‘Influence of Azole Derivates on Corrosion Inhibition of AA6022’, 2019,  Corrosion & Prevention; 23-27 November; Melbourne 2019. Paper ID 112. p 1-12
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Acknowledgement of country

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business. - Artwork created by Louisa Bloomer