News

Latest news from the School of Science.

More targeted, less toxic: the golden future of cancer treatment

Researchers have engineered gold-based molecules that target cancer cells and leave healthy cells unharmed, in a critical step towards precision cancer drugs with fewer toxic side effects.

Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes

The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics will be laser printed and made in minutes. That’s the future imagined by the researchers behind new e-textile technology.

Scientists use phone movement to predict personality types

It turns out the pattern of how your mobile phone moves around says a lot about your personality.

One small step for man, a giant leap for space science

From why women are more efficient astronauts to how space tech can help with bushfire responses, RMIT experts share their insights on current and future space science.

‘Spintronic’ research promises faster, more efficient computing

Researchers have discovered new magnetic properties within atomically thin structures, with exciting potential for the emerging field of “spintronics”.

How Antarctica’s ultimate survivor is helping lighten our footprint

Tiny and virtually indestructible, the “moss piglet” is one of Antarctica’s toughest inhabitants. Now it’s helping us understand how to better protect this most extreme and vulnerable environment.

Goat milk formula could benefit infant gut health: study

Goat milk infant formula has similar prebiotic properties to breast milk and could support healthy gut function in babies, new research suggests.

Branching out: Making graphene from gum trees

Researchers have developed a cost-effective and eco-friendly way of producing graphene using one of Australia’s most abundant resources, eucalyptus trees.

AI to manage road infrastructure via Google Street View

Geospatial scientists have developed a new program to keep track of street sign locations by tapping into Google Street View images.

From the burbs to the bay: GPS tracking reveals how litter travels

In a Victorian-first citizen science project, GPS-tracked bottles will be released in suburban waterways around Melbourne to reveal precisely how litter makes its way from our streets to our beaches.

Building next gen smart materials with the power of sound

Researchers have used sound waves to precisely manipulate atoms and molecules, accelerating the sustainable production of breakthrough smart materials.

Device simplifies study of blood cells, opens new organ-on-chip possibilities.

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body.

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RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nations on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

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